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Beaded Smoking Jacket

Wednesday, April 9th, 2014

Beaded Smoking Jacket

A smoking jacket given to Stafford King in the early 1920s at his induction into the White Earth Band of Ojibwa. Jacket is of chocolate brown velvet with a black velvet collar, a frog and cord front closure and “‘The Hastings’/ BENEDICT & TURNER” label on interior. Appliqué includes floral beadwork and tin jingle cones on the collar, floral beadwork on the cuffs, and jingle cones and other tinwork stitched at the breast and hips.

This jacket can be seen in person in our current Library Lobby display of Native American beadwork. It is open during regular Library hours.

For more information or to purchase a photograph of this item, view this jacket in our collections database.

(Note: The comments section has been temporarily disabled while we upgrade the website. You can always leave comments on our Flickr Photostream at http://www.flickr.com/photos/minnesotahistoricalsociety/)

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Beaded drawstring bag

Wednesday, April 2nd, 2014

Beaded drawstring bag

A large beaded leather drawstring bag with six metal ornaments and blue wool yarn. The bag is either Cheyenne or Dakota (probably Teton) and is from the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation, N.D. Circa 1900.

This bag can also be seen in person in our current Library Lobby display of Native American beadwork. It is open during regular Library hours.

For more information or to purchase a photograph of this item, view this bag in our collections database.

(Note: The comments section has been temporarily disabled while we upgrade the website. You can always leave comments on our Flickr Photostream at http://www.flickr.com/photos/minnesotahistoricalsociety/)

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New Library Exhibit – Native American Beadwork in the MNHS’ Collections

Thursday, March 13th, 2014

Come see the new Library Lobby exhibit on Native America beadwork, open the same hours as the Library.

Minnesota Historical Society is the repository for approximately 9,000 ethnographic objects of Native American origin. These objects include everything from basketry and ceramics to clothing and pipes, and span two and a half centuries. Perhaps 1,000 of those objects are embellished with beads; necklaces, leggings, sashes, shirts, pipe bags, watch fobs, feather bonnets, and things made for sale to the tourist trade are all represented in the Society’s collection, as are objects from every corner of the U.S. and Canada. Due to MNHS’ mission to specifically collect objects that are meaningful to the history of the state of Minnesota, the overwhelming majority of these items come from the immediate area. As a reflection of this regional depth, most of the Native beadwork in our collection falls into either the Plains (for example, Dakota, Lakota, Cheyenne) or Woodland (Ojibwe, Ho-Chunk, Cree) category.

This small exhibit draws specifically from MNHS’ collection of Native American beadwork. It is organized chronologically, beginning with the vitrine to the left when facing the glass doors to the Gale Family Library, and continuing in a clockwise fashion around the library registration desk. Within this exhibit one can explore pre-contact precursors to indigenous beadwork; different techniques used in beadwork; a glimpse of the wide variety of cultural styles in Native beadwork across the U.S. and Canada; how beaded objects functioned in the changing 19th century Native economy; and the modern resurgence of Native American beadwork.

More information can be found on these objects at Minnesota Historical Society’s collections website:

www.mnhs.org/collections

This exhibit will be on view until the end of April.

Leah Bowe
Collections Associate, NAGPRA


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Dakota Pouch

Wednesday, March 12th, 2014

Dakota Pouch

Flat pouch beaded with a geometric pattern of red, white, light blue, dark blue, pink, gold, yellow and green beads lazy-stitched with sinew. Two United States flags are shown in beadwork at the top of one side. The bag was presented to the donor by Dakota of the Standing Rock Indian Reservation, in 1912.

For more information or to purchase a photograph of this item, view this bag in our collections database.

To see more examples of beadwork like this, visit the Library Lobby for the new exhibit on Native American beadwork. It is open regular Library hours.

(Note: The comments section has been temporarily disabled while we upgrade the website. You can always leave comments on our Flickr Photostream at http://www.flickr.com/photos/minnesotahistoricalsociety/)

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Small Beaded Bag

Thursday, February 20th, 2014

Small Beaded Bag

A small beaded velvet bag with yarn embellishment, circa the 1880s.

For details, view this bag in our collections database.

(Note: The comments section has been temporarily disabled while we upgrade the website. You can always leave comments on our Flickr Photostream at http://www.flickr.com/photos/minnesotahistoricalsociety/)

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Cree Beaded Holster

Thursday, January 30th, 2014

Cree Beaded Holster

A Cree beaded leather gun holster made as a tourist item in the early 1900s.

For details, view this holster in our collections database.

(Note: The comments section has been temporarily disabled while we upgrade the website. You can always leave comments on our Flickr Photostream at http://www.flickr.com/photos/minnesotahistoricalsociety/)

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Dakota Inkwell

Thursday, January 16th, 2014

Dakota Beaded Inkwell

Ink bottle covered in bead work and glass stopper for bottle. Beadwork is done on cloth and then applied to the bottle. Rows of beading in green, gold, blue and red. Collected at the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation, South Dakota, circa 1900.

For details, view this inkwell in our collections database.

(Note: The comments section has been temporarily disabled while we upgrade the website. You can always leave comments on our Flickr Photostream at http://www.flickr.com/photos/minnesotahistoricalsociety/)

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Assiniboine pipe bag

Monday, December 23rd, 2013

Assiniboine pipe bag

Assiniboine (Nakota) buckskin pipe bag, ca. 1890. The bag has beadwork on its lower half featuring the image of a horse and is sewn to wool blanket cloth. A double roll of buckskin fringe hangs from the bottom. The fringe and neck of the bag appear to have been dyed yellow at one time. Vertical bars of quillwork decorate the bottom of the bag near the fringe. The neck closes with two short lengths of ribbon.

For details, view this bag in our collections database.

(Note: The comments section has been temporarily disabled while we upgrade the website. You can always leave comments on our Flickr Photostream at http://www.flickr.com/photos/minnesotahistoricalsociety/)

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Ojibwa beaded bandolier bag

Monday, November 25th, 2013

Ojibwa beaded bandolier bag

An unusual beaded bandolier bag using yellow and orange background and geometric flower design. Circa 1880.

For details, view this bag in our collections database.

(Note: The comments section has been temporarily disabled while we upgrade the website. You can always leave comments on our Flickr Photostream at http://www.flickr.com/photos/minnesotahistoricalsociety/)

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Dakota Beaded Moccasins

Monday, November 4th, 2013

Dakota Beaded Moccasins

Pair of sinew sewn leather moccasins with rawhide sole bound with black cotton cloth. Decorated with glass seed beads in geometric pattern. Predominant colors are red, white, yellow, green, and blues. Tongue comprised of 3 tabs with attached metal tinkler cones with remnants of blue feathers. Heel seam fringe and leather thong tie closure.

For details, view these moccasins in our collections database.

Learn More:

(Note: The comments section has been temporarily disabled while we upgrade the website. You can always leave comments on our Flickr Photostream at http://www.flickr.com/photos/minnesotahistoricalsociety/)

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