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Harriet Pope

Wednesday, February 26th, 2014

Harriet Pope

A tintype portrait of Harriet DePuy Pope made around 1870.

For more information or to purchase a photograph of this item, view this photo in our collections database.

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Lillian Victoria Thayer

Wednesday, May 15th, 2013

Lillian Victoria Thayer

Tintype photograph of Lillian Victoria Thayer taken circa 1870.

For details, view the tintype in our online collections database.

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Norwegian spinning wheel

Monday, May 13th, 2013

Norwegian spinning wheel

Flyer or Saxony type spinning wheel made of oak with three turned legs supporting the stock. The wooden treadle shaft connects to twelve-spoke wheel. The flyer assembly is intact with spindle, bobbin, and flyer. The wheel was made in 1845 in Norway and brought to the United States in 1870 and then to Dakota Territory.

The spinning wheel is featured in the Collections Up Close podcast “They Chose Minnesota: Immigration to the North Star State.”

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Willcox & Gibbs sewing machine

Monday, April 8th, 2013

Willcox & Gibbs sewing machine

Noiseless automatic sewing machine designed by by the Willcox & Gibbs Sewing Machine Company in London, England in 1871. The chain-stitch machine is mounted on a wooden table with an iron base, a foot treadle, and three drawers. Used by Frederick Spangenberg and family in St. Paul, Minnesota.

For details, view the sewing machine in our online collections database.

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1870 tintype

Thursday, March 28th, 2013

1870 tintype

Two women (tentatively identified as Harriet Varner and Mrs. Lucius N. Parker) pose for a tintype portrait in a photography studio circa 1870. Photographer unknown.

For details, view the tintype in our online collections database.

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Sunday school class photo, 1877

Tuesday, January 15th, 2013

Sunday school class photo, 1877

Tintype photograph of the Sunday school class held at the Methodist Episcopal Church in Taylors Falls, Minnesota.  A piece of paper accompanying the tintype adds the following information.

This picture of an M[ethodist] E[piscopal] Sunday school class at Taylors Falls was taken about 1877 for presentation to the class teacher, Aunt Matilda (Ward Weeks) Folsom.  The class members were, left to right:

Stradler (went to Stillwater/took up painting); Stowell (his parents lived near old Swedish Luth[eran] church); Alfred “Big” Paine; Edwin Clark; Jacob J. Folsom; Albert “Little” Paine; Edward Clark; Frank Woolley; Walter Folsom

For details, view the tintype in our online collections database.

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Tintype of Ojibwe family

Thursday, December 6th, 2012

Tintype of Ojibwe family

Tintype photograph of an Ojibwe (Anishinaabe) family group created circa 1870. Photographer unknown.

For details, view the tintype in our online collections database.

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Doll dresser

Thursday, November 29th, 2012

Doll dresser

Wooden doll dresser made by cabinetmaker Jacob Gengnagel of Wabasha, Minnesota for his daughter, Katherine, circa 1874.  The dresser has three drawers, carved wooden handles and an attached pivoting mirror.

For details, view the dresser in our online collections database.

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Charles E. Furness

Wednesday, November 28th, 2012

Charles E. Furness

Charles Eliot Furness and a companion pose for a tintype photograph in 1873.  Furness married Marion Ramsey, daughter of Minnesota governor Alexander Ramsey, in 1875.  He died on January 22, 1907 in Rochester, Minnesota.

For details, view the tintype in our online collections database.

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Patent model dust collector

Tuesday, November 20th, 2012

Patent model dust collector

Mahogany and tinned-iron patent model of a flour mill dust collector patented in 1879.  Air to be cleaned arrives from the middlings-purifying station of a mill, entering at the bottom of the device and exiting the top.  Dust collects on cloth filters as the air is forced through. A brass cam-shaft, driven by a maple belt-wheel, agitates the filters causing accumulated dust to fall to the bottom of the apparatus, where it is moved out by an auger-type conveyor.

The introduction of dust-collecting methods to flour factories greatly increased the safety of the milling process, preventing dust-ignited explosions like the one that destroyed Minneapolis’ Washburn A Mill in 1878.

For details, view the dust collector in our online collections database.

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An Ounce of Preservation: A Guide to the Care of Papers and Photographs