Minnesota Historical Society M-Flame Logo

Home / Collections / Podcast & Blog » Item of the Day

Collections

Collections Up Close

Item of the Day

Archived Posts from this Category

MN Kicks

Posted byJason Onerheim on 20 Aug 2014 | Tagged as: Item of the Day

An orange Minnesota Kicks halter-top. Circa 1976-1981.

For more information or to purchase a photograph of this item, view this top in our collections database.

(Note: The comments section has been temporarily disabled while we upgrade the website. You can always leave comments on our Flickr Photostream at http://www.flickr.com/photos/minnesotahistoricalsociety/)

Bookmark and Share

Engineman’s Hat

Posted byJason Onerheim on 19 Aug 2014 | Tagged as: Item of the Day

United States Navy first class engineman’s dress blue cap that was worn by Seth A. Brown of Saint Paul, Minnesota, who served on the Pacific fleet tug USS Pinola (AT-33) after World War I. The cap (.C) has a disc-shaped crown on a standing band that is faced with black ribbon and embroidered “U.S.S. PINOLA” in gold. Cap is lined with blue silk inked “S.A. BROWN”.

For more information or to purchase a photograph of this item, view this cap and the rest of Brown’s uniform in our collections database.

(Note: The comments section has been temporarily disabled while we upgrade the website. You can always leave comments on our Flickr Photostream at http://www.flickr.com/photos/minnesotahistoricalsociety/)

Bookmark and Share

Norwegian Trunk

Posted byJason Onerheim on 18 Aug 2014 | Tagged as: Item of the Day

A large wooden trunk with a domed lid made in Norway and brought to Minnesota. The trunk is painted with rosemaling inside and out and has wrought iron top and side bail handles, as well as side braces and lock plate. “Fidri, Knuds, Datter, Ldjen, Aar 1825″ is painted on the front of the trunk.

For more information or to purchase a photograph of this item, view this trunk in our collections database.

(Note: The comments section has been temporarily disabled while we upgrade the website. You can always leave comments on our Flickr Photostream at http://www.flickr.com/photos/minnesotahistoricalsociety/)

Bookmark and Share

Emma and her Brownie

Posted byJason Onerheim on 15 Aug 2014 | Tagged as: Item of the Day

The Minnesota Historical Society loves photography and thus declares this week to be the “Unofficial History of Photography Week”. Each day we will post an image from a different photographic method.

Today we present this black and white print of Emma Ray and her Brownie box camera in 1917. Emma was a prolific St. Paul photographer at the turn of the century. Photography was forever changed with the invention of the Brownie camera in 1900. It was a low cost and easy to use format and popularized amateur photography and the candid “snapshot”.

To learn more about the Sadie and Emma Ray photography collection, please watch this podcast.

For more information or to purchase a photograph of this item, view this photograph in our collections database.

(Note: The comments section has been temporarily disabled while we upgrade the website. You can always leave comments on our Flickr Photostream at http://www.flickr.com/photos/minnesotahistoricalsociety/)

Bookmark and Share

First State Capitol

Posted byJason Onerheim on 14 Aug 2014 | Tagged as: Item of the Day

The Minnesota Historical Society loves photography and thus declares this week to be the “Unofficial History of Photography Week”. Each day we will post an image from a different photographic method.

Today we present this Carte de Visite showing the first Minnesota State Capitol in 1865. The Carte de Visite was a wildly successful photographic medium because it used a negative/paper print process which made it possible to make cheap multiples from a single negative. A glass negative is made, sometimes with several images of the same subject on it, and then is used to make a paper albumen print which is mounted on a card.

For more information or to purchase a photograph of this item, view this photograph in our collections database.

(Note: The comments section has been temporarily disabled while we upgrade the website. You can always leave comments on our Flickr Photostream at http://www.flickr.com/photos/minnesotahistoricalsociety/)

Bookmark and Share

Sam Bloomer

Posted byJason Onerheim on 13 Aug 2014 | Tagged as: Item of the Day

The Minnesota Historical Society loves photography and thus declares this week to be the “Unofficial History of Photography Week”. Each day we will post an image from a different photographic method.

Today we present this tintype portrait of Samuel Bloomer, member of Company B of the First Minnesota. The tintype was a popular photographic method in the 1860s and 70s because it was fast to make, much cheaper than a daguerreotype and was relatively durable. The process was similar to the ambrotype, but instead of glass, the image is made on a black lacquered piece of iron.

For more information or to purchase a photograph of this item, view this photograph in our collections database.

(Note: The comments section has been temporarily disabled while we upgrade the website. You can always leave comments on our Flickr Photostream at http://www.flickr.com/photos/minnesotahistoricalsociety/)

Bookmark and Share

Densmore Family

Posted byJason Onerheim on 12 Aug 2014 | Tagged as: Item of the Day

The Minnesota Historical Society loves photography and thus declares this week to be the “Unofficial History of Photography Week”. Each day we will post an image from a different photographic method.

Today we present this ambrotype double portrait of the Densmore family, circa 1863. The ambrotype process is an off-shoot of the wet-plate collodion process where a positive image is made on glass then viewed against a black background.

For more information or to purchase a photograph of this item, view this photograph in our collections database.

(Note: The comments section has been temporarily disabled while we upgrade the website. You can always leave comments on our Flickr Photostream at http://www.flickr.com/photos/minnesotahistoricalsociety/)

Bookmark and Share

Three Men

Posted byJason Onerheim on 11 Aug 2014 | Tagged as: Item of the Day

The Minnesota Historical Society loves photography and thus declares this week to be the “Unofficial History of Photography Week”. Each day we will post an image from a different photographic method.

Today we present this 1/4 plate Daguerreotype of three men drinking, circa 1870. The daguerreotype was one of the first photographic processes in wide-spread use. It uses a polished silver plate that is developed over fuming mercury and then sealed in a case to prevent oxidation of the silver plate.

For more information or to purchase a photograph of this item, view this photograph in our collections database.

(Note: The comments section has been temporarily disabled while we upgrade the website. You can always leave comments on our Flickr Photostream at http://www.flickr.com/photos/minnesotahistoricalsociety/)

Bookmark and Share

Friday the 13th

Posted byJason Onerheim on 08 Aug 2014 | Tagged as: Item of the Day

A photo of a girl pointing out Friday the 13th on an August 1937 calendar.

This image forms part of our Minneapolis and St. Paul Newspaper Negative collection. Additional photographs in this series may be available in the library, please view the finding aid here.

For more information or to purchase a photograph of this item, view this photograph in our collections database.

(Note: The comments section has been temporarily disabled while we upgrade the website. You can always leave comments on our Flickr Photostream at http://www.flickr.com/photos/minnesotahistoricalsociety/)

Bookmark and Share

Hamm’s Bottle

Posted byJason Onerheim on 07 Aug 2014 | Tagged as: Item of the Day

A brown glass bottle of “Hamm’s Export” beer, circa 1930s.

For more information or to purchase a photograph of this item, view this bottle in our collections database.

(Note: The comments section has been temporarily disabled while we upgrade the website. You can always leave comments on our Flickr Photostream at http://www.flickr.com/photos/minnesotahistoricalsociety/)

Bookmark and Share

Next Page »



An Ounce of Preservation: A Guide to the Care of Papers and Photographs