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Diary entry by Thomas Montgomery of the 7th Minnesota Regiment, Company K – August 1, 1864

Posted byLori Williamson on 01 Aug 2014 | Tagged as: Civil War Daybook

Clear and airy, warm. Feel much better thank God. able to walk round with ease. [I] making out my monthly returns of C. C & G. E. & clothing Receipt Roes[.] Two chemneys fell[.] Co drew rations[.] Writing a letter[.]


Citation: August 1, 1864. Diary entry by Thomas Montgomery, Diary, 1864. Thomas Montgomery and family papers. Minnesota Historical Society. [P2812 box 1]

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“From Memphis” and “Glimpses of the South”, The Saint Paul Press – July 31, 1864

Posted byLori Williamson on 31 Jul 2014 | Tagged as: Civil War Daybook

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Letter from Thomas Christie, near Atlanta, to his brother providing an overview of how General Sherman’s Army is organized – July 30, 1864

Posted byLori Williamson on 30 Jul 2014 | Tagged as: Civil War Daybook

Letter from Thomas Christie, near Atlanta, to his brother, Alexander Christie, providing an overview of how General Sherman’s Army is organized.

A partial transcription of the letter:

Mighty near Atlanta, Sa July 30th 1864
My Dear Sandy,
[…] I see in the accounts of our fight on the 22nd published in the Louisville papers the most glaring mistakes in regard to the different Corps engaged & for fear you do not understand how Sherman’s Army is organized, I will tell you. Sherman’s Grand Army is composed of the troops of three Departments of the Military Division of the Mississippi, each commanded by the Departmental Commander & all independent of each other, acting under the supreme command of Genl. Sherman. These Armies are – The Army of the Cumberland, Genl. Thomas; The Army of the Ohio, Genl. Schofield; & our own Army of the Tennessee, before the 22nd under McPherson, then for awhile under Genl. Logan, & now commanded by Maj. Genl. Howard, one of the best men in Uncle Sam’s Army. Now each of these Armies is composed of Army Corps, – the Army of the Cumberland of three – the 4th Corps, of Howard’s (I do not know who commands it now) the 14th Corps – (Palmers) & the 20th Corps (Hookers). The Army of the Ohio has only one Corps here, – the 23rd – & Schofield commands it in person – The Army of the Tennessee has three Corps, – The 15th (Genl. Logan) 16th (Genl. Dodge) & the 17th (Genl. Blair).[.] Each of the Army Corps is composed of 2, 3, or 4 Divisions & the Divisions are subdivided in to Brigades, composed of three or four Regts. each. The two Divisions of our Corps that are present (3rd & 4th) are commanded now by Genls. Legget & Giles M. Smith respectively, since our Genl. Gresham was wounded on the 20th. Now you understand how Sherman’s Army is composed better than two thirds of the Army Corespondents here. […]
Think of the duck hunting we will have with that famous Rifle when you again see your Affectionate brother[,]
Thos. D. Christie



See whole letter here: 1864-07-30_Christie_combined

Citation:  July 30, 1864. Letter from Thomas Christie to brother Alexander. James C. Christie and Family Papers. Letters Dec. 6 1863-May 25, 1865. Minnesota Historical Society. [P1281 box B]

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“New Infantry Regiment”, “From Sherman’s Army” and “Late News Items”, Saint Paul Pioneer and Democrat – July 29, 1864

Posted byLori Williamson on 29 Jul 2014 | Tagged as: Civil War Daybook

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“Bad News from Shenandoah Valley” and”From Sherman’s Army”, The Saint Cloud Democrat – July 28, 1864

Posted byLori Williamson on 28 Jul 2014 | Tagged as: Civil War Daybook

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Diary entry by James N. Woodbury, 9th Regiment, Co C., who has been taken captive by rebels and is being held at Andersonville Prison, Georgia– July 27, 1864

Posted byLori Williamson on 27 Jul 2014 | Tagged as: Civil War Daybook

“Cloudy and Hot[.] camp full of roomers[.] the after noon it clouds up and looks like rain[.] rains a little in the evening[.]” Woodbury himself was taken to the hospital the previous day, and his diary is now in the possession of Nathan Palmer, another Union captive at Andersonville Prison, who is continuing the entries.

Citation:  July 27, 1864 James Woodbury Diary, May – October 1864. Diary and miscellaneous letters and papers, 1862-1908. Minnesota Historical Society. [P1091]

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Letter from surgeon Ebenezer Mattocks to his sister – July 26, 1864

Posted byLori Williamson on 26 Jul 2014 | Tagged as: Civil War Daybook

A personal letter from Ebenezer Brewer Mattocks, a surgeon in the Minnesota Seventh Regiment, to his sister Nellie, written near Waterford, Mississippi, giving details of his work as a surgeon and the treatment of “rebel families”.

Partial transcript:

…The next morning our artillary came up and we commenced shelling them-and prepared to cross and “go” for them five companies went …in a boat and I went with them as surgeon  we succeeded in driving the enemy- with but three wounded—Almost every day since we have had fighting in our front but our regiment has not been engaged- Yesterday our forces killed and wounded nearly 50 rebels…I love this kind of life- am perfectly happy when there is fighting to be done- I have been ordered by the medical Director in our next battle to act as brigade surgeon- in the field- that is I am the only surgeon in our brigade who is to accompany the brigade into battle- the other surgeons are to remain back two miles…[my] duties are to staunch the bleeding wounds-see them loaded, and send them back to the rear.  I stand no better chance now than the rest of the officers and men- but yet I hope I woun’t get killed…I give you an idea of how the soldiers use Rebel families.  I will give you an instance- when we came here there was a large house near by- with a large family- with a great many little children- our soldiers stole every thing there was in the house- even to their clothes- knives & forks & now we must feed them or they would starve- Such outrages ought not to be  tolerated- sometimes my heart bleeds for the people rebels though they are…

See whole letter here: 1864-07-26_brewer

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Quartermaster’s map of Atlanta, Georgia – July 25, 1864

Posted byLori Williamson on 25 Jul 2014 | Tagged as: Civil War Daybook

Street map of Atlanta, Georgia printed on cotton fabric.  The map includes streets, railroad lines, waterways, and an index to twenty building locations.  Across the bottom is: “Drawn and printed at Top’l.  Engr. Office, Hed. Qrs. A.C., in the field, July 25th, 1864.”  The signature of “W.G. LeDuc” is in black ink in the upper left.  The map was used during the Civil War by Brigadier General William Gates LeDuc of Minnesota, who served in the quartermaster’s department throughout the war.

See it in Collections Online.

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“Glorious News from Sherman”, “From Washington”, and “Story of Rebel Deserter”, The Saint Paul Press – July 24, 1864

Posted byLori Williamson on 24 Jul 2014 | Tagged as: Civil War Daybook

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“The News” and “The Third Draft”, The Rochester City Post – July 23, 1864

Posted byLori Williamson on 23 Jul 2014 | Tagged as: Civil War Daybook

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