Home / Collections / Podcast & Blog » Search Results » “bandolier bag”

Collections

Collections Up Close

March 6, 2017

Ojibwe Bandolier Bag

Filed under: Item of the Day — Jason Onerheim @ 12:01 am

An Ojibwe loom-woven and spot-stitched bandolier bag with front pocket. Exhibited at the World’s Columbian Exposition in 1893 as part of the Becker County Indian Exhibit and attributed to the “Becker County Indian Industries.” This bandolier bag is shown hanging on the left in a photograph of the “American Indian collection of Mrs. Jessie C. Yeats, Becker County, Minnesota” (#4969) from the Becker County Historical Society. Mrs. Jessie C West (misspelling for photograph) was Becker County’s representative at the Columbian Exposition at Chicago in 1893.

For more information or to purchase a photograph of this item, view this bag in our collections database.

November 7, 2016

Ojibwe Bandolier Bag

Filed under: Item of the Day — Jason Onerheim @ 12:01 am

An Ojibwe black velvet and dark blue wool bandolier bag spot-stitched with a rabbit track pattern of multi-color glass seed beads on a white bead background. Probably made in the late 1890s.

For more information or to purchase a photograph of this item, view this bag in our collections database.

May 16, 2016

Bandolier Bag

Filed under: Item of the Day — Jason Onerheim @ 12:01 am

An Ojibwe bandolier bag is decorated with beadwork in a hexagonal pattern over the bag and strap. The hexagonal pattern stops at the pocket of the bag and is then decorated with a beaded floral design. Probably made in the 1910s.

For more information or to purchase a photograph of this item, view this bag in our collections database.

October 20, 2015

St. Louis Collection of American Indian Cultural Material

Filed under: What's New — Lori Williamson @ 3:52 pm


Recently published online is a large donation from an anonymous donor from St. Louis, Missouri. The collection consists of American Indian cultural material from Minnesota and local regions. Encompassing 258 objects, the collection contains bandolier bags, moccasins, pipe bags and various ceremonial objects.

The majority of the collection was amassed by Alfred “Gafe” Peterson of Cass Lake, MN starting circa 1920 until the donor bought the collection from Gafe in 1974. Some objects are dated to the early 19th century. Unfortunately, the collection did not come with much information regarding its items.

However, one of the bandolier bags and a beaded shirt does have documented history. John Smith, Ka-Be-Nah-Gwey-Wence, also known as the Oldest Living Ojibwe, is seen in multiple photographs wearing the beaded shirt and bandolier bag: in the portrait seen here he is wearing the shirt pictured below. Smith was thought to have lived into his 130s, with many people in the Cass Lake area familiar with him. We have many photographs of Smith wearing traditional Ojibwe beadwork and having the actual objects are a great addition to the collection.

See more pieces from this wonderful collection in Collections Online.

Rita Walaszek, Collections Assistant

September 21, 2015

Ojibwe Bandolier Bag

Filed under: Item of the Day — Jason Onerheim @ 12:01 am

An Ojibwe black velvet bandolier bag featuring spot-stitched pocket, panel and strap decorated with multi-color symmetrical floral and vine motifs. All edges are bound with yellow fabric tape and the bag and strap are lined with tan cotton cloth. There are beaded yarn tassels along the base. Made in the late 1800s.

For more information or to purchase a photograph of this item, view this bag in our collections database.

(Note: The comments section has been temporarily disabled while we upgrade the website. You can always leave comments on our Flickr Photostream at http://www.flickr.com/photos/minnesotahistoricalsociety/)

May 11, 2015

Bandolier Bag

Filed under: Item of the Day — Jason Onerheim @ 12:01 am

An Ojibwe bandolier bag with a beaded floral pattern most likely made in the 1890s. It was reportedly obtained through William F. “Buffalo Bill” Cody.

For more information or to purchase a photograph of this item, view this bag in our collections database.

(Note: The comments section has been temporarily disabled while we upgrade the website. You can always leave comments on our Flickr Photostream at http://www.flickr.com/photos/minnesotahistoricalsociety/)

December 22, 2014

Beaded Bandolier Bag

Filed under: Item of the Day — Jason Onerheim @ 12:01 am

A beaded calico bandolier bag was made by Becker County Indian Industries and exhibited at the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago, Illinois.

For more information or to purchase a photograph of this item, view this bag in our collections database.

(Note: The comments section has been temporarily disabled while we upgrade the website. You can always leave comments on our Flickr Photostream at http://www.flickr.com/photos/minnesotahistoricalsociety/)

November 10, 2014

Bandolier Bag

Filed under: Item of the Day — Jason Onerheim @ 12:01 am

A White Earth Ojiwbe bandolier bag made in the early 1900s and owned by Darwin S. Hall who was chairman of the Chippewa Indian Commission.

For more information or to purchase a photograph of this item, view this bag in our collections database.

(Note: The comments section has been temporarily disabled while we upgrade the website. You can always leave comments on our Flickr Photostream at http://www.flickr.com/photos/minnesotahistoricalsociety/)

September 9, 2014

Bandolier Bag

Filed under: Item of the Day — Jason Onerheim @ 12:01 am

A large beaded bandolier bag with flower/bird designs and includes the initials “MF” sewn into the top of the strap.

For more information or to purchase a photograph of this item, view this bag in our collections database.

(Note: The comments section has been temporarily disabled while we upgrade the website. You can always leave comments on our Flickr Photostream at http://www.flickr.com/photos/minnesotahistoricalsociety/)

August 18, 2014

Artists Selected for 2014/15 Native American Artist-in-Residence Program

Filed under: What's New — Lori Williamson @ 10:30 am


The Minnesota Historical Society has recently awarded three six-month paid residencies to artists Jessica Gokey, Pat Kruse and Gwen Westerman. Each artist works in a traditional media, which together represent many of the major historical art forms of the region: beadwork, birchbark, and textiles (ribbonwork).

These residencies were created to provide opportunities for artists to use collections at MNHS, as well as at other institutions, in order to develop their respective art forms. These residencies, while rooted in historical research, are designed to provide a platform for artists to move their art forward. While in residence, each of these artists will continue to develop research and community outreach plans that delve deeply and broadly into their communities, to gain new knowledge and to share their expertise.

Jessica Gokey, is a beadwork artist who lives in the Lac Courte Oreilles (LCO) community in Hayward, Wisconsin. She has been beading for more than ten years and shares her knowledge with members of the community by teaching at the LCO Ojibwa Community College. Gokey believes that sharing her “knowledge of traditional Ojibwe beadwork will help preserve the art of beadwork for future generations.” She plans on researching the extensive bandolier bag and other beadwork collections.


Pat Kruse, a birch bark artist who lives in the Mille Lacs community in Minnesota, has been working with birch bark for more than 30 years. Kruse creates birch bark products “to honor the old ways and the ancestors that practiced these ways.” He will research the birch bark collections and continue to build an apprentice relationship with his son, in order to pass on this traditional knowledge.

Gwen Westerman, Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate, is a textile artist who lives in Good Thunder, Minnesota. As a member of the six generations of women in her family who have made quilts, she sees quilts as having not only a utilitarian function but also as containing stories. Westerman has been expanding her textile arts with other traditional art forms to “find new ways to tell our stories.” She plans on researching and revitalizing traditions of Dakota ribbonwork.

The Artists-in-Residence were selected based on the recommendations of a panel consisting of experts in the field of Native American arts and culture. The panel members are Sasha Brown (Santee Dakota), Joe Horse Capture (A’aninin Tribe of Montana) and Scott Shoemaker (Miami Nation).

The Native American Artist-in-Residence program is made possible in part by a grant from the Margaret A. Cargill Foundation.

Rita Walaszek, Collections Assistant
Ben Gessner, Native American Artist-in-Residence Program Coordinator

Next Page »


An Ounce of Preservation: A Guide to the Care of Papers and Photographs