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Archive for September, 2016

Skunk Game

Monday, September 19th, 2016

A “Skunk” dice game made by W.H. Schaper Manufacturing Company, Incorporated of Minneapolis, Minnesota, circa 1950-1960.

For more information or to purchase a photograph of this item, view this game in our collections database.

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Republican Balloons

Friday, September 16th, 2016

A photograph of balloons being handed out before a Republican Party rally and parade in St. Paul on November 3rd, 1950. The balloons read “Vote for good government. Vote Republican.”

This image forms part of our Minneapolis and St. Paul Newspaper Negative collection. Additional photographs in this series may be available in the library, please view the finding aid here.

For more information or to purchase a photograph of this item, view this photograph in our collections database.

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Betty Crocker

Thursday, September 15th, 2016

A color postcard showing how the Betty Crocker character has changed from 1936 to 1981.

For more information or to purchase a photograph of this item, view this postcard in our collections database.

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Flasher Button

Wednesday, September 14th, 2016

A “flasher” button alternating “Vote / DFL / ‘58″ with “VOTE FOR / FREEMAN-McCARTHY”, from Orville Freeman’s gubernatorial re-election campaign and Eugene McCarthy’s United States Senate campaign, 1958.

For more information or to purchase a photograph of this item, view this button in our collections database.

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World War I Daybook Preview: A Nurse’s Story

Tuesday, September 13th, 2016

Hello, my name is Rose Winter, and I was one of two interns working on the World War I Daybook project this summer. I spent my internship going through a variety of smaller manuscript collections in the Gale Family Library, my favorite of which was the Dee Smith collection.

Dee Smith left her clerical job with the Minneapolis Department of Education in June 1918 to go overseas with the Red Cross Department of Personnel in Paris. Her letters home, which are the main component of this collection, were usually addressed to her mother and a woman named Cora who may have been her sister. They are seldom about her work, and instead concerned matters such as going sightseeing, having fun with her friends, and descriptions of wartime Paris.

Letters from July 1918, when Smith was in New York waiting to ship out, reassure her family that she would not be needing a ball gown. This decision was farsighted because in September of that year, when she was in Paris, the American Expeditionary Forces took over the American Red Cross to the extent that Smith was considered service personnel and so wearing her uniform in public became mandatory for the remainder of the war. Smith was not terribly pleased with this decision, especially as it meant she had to wear it to the many dances she attended “to keep morale up.” The uniform also made her instantly recognizable as an American woman overseas.

Although writing of many lighthearted matters, Smith’s letters also directly address the war. Smith visited American troops in hospitals in some of her free time. In January of 1919, after armistice, she visited several battlefields, and that May she used her vacation time to tour Belgium and the defeated Germany. The letters she wrote about this tour show her extreme hatred for Germans, remarking that Germans were ugly, describing American troops stealing cabbage from a German woman for Smith and her friend to eat, and hinting that she thought German prisoners of war were so lazy they ought to be bayoneted. Considering that the application process for overseas Red Cross workers included letters of recommendation proving their loyalty and patriotism for the United States and its allies, this hatred is not entirely surprising. It was only long after armistice that she revealed she had been in Paris while it was being bombed, with bombs falling within blocks of where she was, as censoring had kept her from writing earlier. Other than censoring, her continual fear was that the boats with mail would be torpedoed and her letters would never make it home.

My favorite letter of Smith’s was written on January 23rd, 1919, during the Paris peace talks. While on her lunch break she and a friend went to buy as much jam as they could possibly carry, stuffing their arms and pockets so as to avoid the long lines at the store by reducing their number of trips. While walking back to work in this condition they suddenly realized that the man walking toward them on the street was President Woodrow Wilson, with his secret security agents following behind him. She states in the letter that, “We smiled our best, bowed, and said “Bon Jour” which is good morning in French. He [President Wilson] lifted his high silk hat, bowed and smiled. [...] We were in a perfect misery of indecision afterwards to as whether his affability was due to his delight in seeing us or our most amusing appearance of a grocery delivery wagon.”

See whole letter here: 1-23-19 complete

Look for more of Dee Smith’s letters in the World War I Daybook when it launches in April 2017!

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Bumper Sticker

Tuesday, September 13th, 2016

A bumper sticker supporting the Idle No More movement. The rectangular sticker has a red backdrop with tan text that reads “We / Are / IdleNoMore” The movement began in 2012 as a pan-Native solidarity movement in Canada that quickly gained followers in the United States. Idle No More staged a flash mob at the Mall of America in Bloomington, Minnesota, on December 29, 2012.

For more information or to purchase a photograph of this item, view this sticker in our collections database.

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Minnesota Made Shotgun

Monday, September 12th, 2016

A 12-gauge double-barreled side-by-side shotgun made by Frank Novotny of Saint Paul, Minnesota. The gun has Damascus barrels, a double trigger, and a pistol grip stock that is checkered at the grip and fore end. It was owned and used by engineer D. C. Shepard, an associate of James J. Hill who helped construct rail lines including the Great Northern and Canadian Pacific.

For more information or to purchase a photograph of this item, view this shotgun in our collections database.

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Stuck

Friday, September 9th, 2016

“Help, I’m stuck on the elevator!” said the delivery truck. 1950.

This image forms part of our Minneapolis and St. Paul Newspaper Negative collection. Additional photographs in this series may be available in the library, please view the finding aid here.

For more information or to purchase a photograph of this item, view this photograph in our collections database.

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Leaf and Berry Pattern Quilt

Thursday, September 8th, 2016

An appliquéd sawtooth-edged cotton quilt with four center panels of oak leaf and vine appliqué in a green print. Miscellaneous fruits and flowers are arranged at the base of each vine extending into the extension. This same floral vine edges both sides. The cutout corners fit a four-poster bed. From the 1870s.

For more information or to purchase a photograph of this item, view this quilt in our collections database.

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Augie on Guitar

Wednesday, September 7th, 2016

A photograph showing the internationally famous Mexican-American musician Augie Garcia and his guitar. While he learned traditional Mexican music as a kid, he later played rhythm and blues. What about those shorts? The Twin Cities Music Highlights website (http://www.jeanneandersen.net/garciaaugie.html) has this to say, “The story also goes that while in Hawaii in 1952 he fell in love with Bermuda shorts as a fashion statement. They became his trademark and he wore them winter and summer.”

For more information or to purchase a photograph of this item, view this photograph in our collections database.

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An Ounce of Preservation: A Guide to the Care of Papers and Photographs