Home / Collections / Podcast & Blog » 2014 » August

Collections

Collections Up Close

Archive for August, 2014

MN Kicks

Wednesday, August 20th, 2014

An orange Minnesota Kicks halter-top. Circa 1976-1981.

For more information or to purchase a photograph of this item, view this top in our collections database.

(Note: The comments section has been temporarily disabled while we upgrade the website. You can always leave comments on our Flickr Photostream at http://www.flickr.com/photos/minnesotahistoricalsociety/)

Bookmark and Share

“Rebels on the Ohio”, “From Grant’s Army”, and “From Sherman’s Army”, The Saint Paul Pioneer and Democrat – August 19, 1864

Tuesday, August 19th, 2014

Bookmark and Share

Engineman’s Hat

Tuesday, August 19th, 2014

United States Navy first class engineman’s dress blue cap that was worn by Seth A. Brown of Saint Paul, Minnesota, who served on the Pacific fleet tug USS Pinola (AT-33) after World War I. The cap (.C) has a disc-shaped crown on a standing band that is faced with black ribbon and embroidered “U.S.S. PINOLA” in gold. Cap is lined with blue silk inked “S.A. BROWN”.

For more information or to purchase a photograph of this item, view this cap and the rest of Brown’s uniform in our collections database.

(Note: The comments section has been temporarily disabled while we upgrade the website. You can always leave comments on our Flickr Photostream at http://www.flickr.com/photos/minnesotahistoricalsociety/)

Bookmark and Share

Artists Selected for 2014/15 Native American Artist-in-Residence Program

Monday, August 18th, 2014


The Minnesota Historical Society has recently awarded three six-month paid residencies to artists Jessica Gokey, Pat Kruse and Gwen Westerman. Each artist works in a traditional media, which together represent many of the major historical art forms of the region: beadwork, birchbark, and textiles (ribbonwork).

These residencies were created to provide opportunities for artists to use collections at MNHS, as well as at other institutions, in order to develop their respective art forms. These residencies, while rooted in historical research, are designed to provide a platform for artists to move their art forward. While in residence, each of these artists will continue to develop research and community outreach plans that delve deeply and broadly into their communities, to gain new knowledge and to share their expertise.

Jessica Gokey, is a beadwork artist who lives in the Lac Courte Oreilles (LCO) community in Hayward, Wisconsin. She has been beading for more than ten years and shares her knowledge with members of the community by teaching at the LCO Ojibwa Community College. Gokey believes that sharing her “knowledge of traditional Ojibwe beadwork will help preserve the art of beadwork for future generations.” She plans on researching the extensive bandolier bag and other beadwork collections.


Pat Kruse, a birch bark artist who lives in the Mille Lacs community in Minnesota, has been working with birch bark for more than 30 years. Kruse creates birch bark products “to honor the old ways and the ancestors that practiced these ways.” He will research the birch bark collections and continue to build an apprentice relationship with his son, in order to pass on this traditional knowledge.

Gwen Westerman, Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate, is a textile artist who lives in Good Thunder, Minnesota. As a member of the six generations of women in her family who have made quilts, she sees quilts as having not only a utilitarian function but also as containing stories. Westerman has been expanding her textile arts with other traditional art forms to “find new ways to tell our stories.” She plans on researching and revitalizing traditions of Dakota ribbonwork.

The Artists-in-Residence were selected based on the recommendations of a panel consisting of experts in the field of Native American arts and culture. The panel members are Sasha Brown (Santee Dakota), Joe Horse Capture (A’aninin Tribe of Montana) and Scott Shoemaker (Miami Nation).

The Native American Artist-in-Residence program is made possible in part by a grant from the Margaret A. Cargill Foundation.

Rita Walaszek, Collections Assistant
Ben Gessner, Native American Artist-in-Residence Program Coordinator

Bookmark and Share

“From The Seventh Regiment” and “Latest News By Telegraph”, The St. Cloud Democrat – August 18, 1864

Monday, August 18th, 2014

Bookmark and Share

Norwegian Trunk

Monday, August 18th, 2014

A large wooden trunk with a domed lid made in Norway and brought to Minnesota. The trunk is painted with rosemaling inside and out and has wrought iron top and side bail handles, as well as side braces and lock plate. “Fidri, Knuds, Datter, Ldjen, Aar 1825″ is painted on the front of the trunk.

For more information or to purchase a photograph of this item, view this trunk in our collections database.

(Note: The comments section has been temporarily disabled while we upgrade the website. You can always leave comments on our Flickr Photostream at http://www.flickr.com/photos/minnesotahistoricalsociety/)

Bookmark and Share

“Telegraphic news”, The Goodhue Volunteer – August 17, 1864

Sunday, August 17th, 2014

Bookmark and Share

“The Hardships of the Draft” and “News Items”, The Stillwater Messenger – August 16, 1864

Saturday, August 16th, 2014

Bookmark and Share

Diary entry by Thomas Montgomery of the 7th Minnesota Regiment, Company K – August 15, 1864

Friday, August 15th, 2014

Cleaned up once more[.] Camp dry again. Drilled compy. 2 hours in forenoon. Guard mounts at 9 a.m. now. Have charge of the Battalion[.] at work on the Trenches. Got a load of brick to brick our tent. A story I find is being circulated in camp to my discredit.

Citation: August 15, 1864. Diary entry by Thomas Montgomery, Diary, 1864. Thomas Montgomery and family papers. Minnesota Historical Society. [P2812 box 1]

Bookmark and Share

Emma and her Brownie

Friday, August 15th, 2014

The Minnesota Historical Society loves photography and thus declares this week to be the “Unofficial History of Photography Week”. Each day we will post an image from a different photographic method.

Today we present this black and white print of Emma Ray and her Brownie box camera in 1917. Emma was a prolific St. Paul photographer at the turn of the century. Photography was forever changed with the invention of the Brownie camera in 1900. It was a low cost and easy to use format and popularized amateur photography and the candid “snapshot”.

To learn more about the Sadie and Emma Ray photography collection, please watch this podcast.

For more information or to purchase a photograph of this item, view this photograph in our collections database.

(Note: The comments section has been temporarily disabled while we upgrade the website. You can always leave comments on our Flickr Photostream at http://www.flickr.com/photos/minnesotahistoricalsociety/)

Bookmark and Share


An Ounce of Preservation: A Guide to the Care of Papers and Photographs