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July 30, 2014

Letter from Thomas Christie, near Atlanta, to his brother providing an overview of how General Sherman’s Army is organized – July 30, 1864

Filed under: Civil War Daybook — Lori Williamson @ 9:00 am

Letter from Thomas Christie, near Atlanta, to his brother, Alexander Christie, providing an overview of how General Sherman’s Army is organized.

A partial transcription of the letter:

Mighty near Atlanta, Sa July 30th 1864
My Dear Sandy,
[…] I see in the accounts of our fight on the 22nd published in the Louisville papers the most glaring mistakes in regard to the different Corps engaged & for fear you do not understand how Sherman’s Army is organized, I will tell you. Sherman’s Grand Army is composed of the troops of three Departments of the Military Division of the Mississippi, each commanded by the Departmental Commander & all independent of each other, acting under the supreme command of Genl. Sherman. These Armies are – The Army of the Cumberland, Genl. Thomas; The Army of the Ohio, Genl. Schofield; & our own Army of the Tennessee, before the 22nd under McPherson, then for awhile under Genl. Logan, & now commanded by Maj. Genl. Howard, one of the best men in Uncle Sam’s Army. Now each of these Armies is composed of Army Corps, – the Army of the Cumberland of three – the 4th Corps, of Howard’s (I do not know who commands it now) the 14th Corps – (Palmers) & the 20th Corps (Hookers). The Army of the Ohio has only one Corps here, – the 23rd – & Schofield commands it in person – The Army of the Tennessee has three Corps, – The 15th (Genl. Logan) 16th (Genl. Dodge) & the 17th (Genl. Blair).[.] Each of the Army Corps is composed of 2, 3, or 4 Divisions & the Divisions are subdivided in to Brigades, composed of three or four Regts. each. The two Divisions of our Corps that are present (3rd & 4th) are commanded now by Genls. Legget & Giles M. Smith respectively, since our Genl. Gresham was wounded on the 20th. Now you understand how Sherman’s Army is composed better than two thirds of the Army Corespondents here. […]
Think of the duck hunting we will have with that famous Rifle when you again see your Affectionate brother[,]
Thos. D. Christie



See whole letter here: 1864-07-30_Christie_combined

Citation:  July 30, 1864. Letter from Thomas Christie to brother Alexander. James C. Christie and Family Papers. Letters Dec. 6 1863-May 25, 1865. Minnesota Historical Society. [P1281 box B]

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