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Journal entry by Sergeant George Buckman of Company G, 1st Minnesota, on the use of cartridges and munitions by the soldiers – November 25, 1863

Monday, November 25th, 2013

Partial transcription of Buckman’s journal entry:
25th Nov 1863.
Cloudy. Roads in bad condition. Large details of men engaged in corduroying the worst places. Sutlers are asking great prices for their goods. […] The rules in regard to cartridges will save the government thousands of dollars in the course of a year. There are more munitions of war wasted than are used in battle, for the simple reason that the men have no place to carry them, except in their pockets and knapsacks.  Any orders that relate to the taking off a part of a soldier’s load are always welcomed.  The American soldier carries too much weight.

[Click on image to enlarge]


Citation: November 25, 1863, Sergeant George Buckman journal entry. George Buckman Civil War Papers, 1861-1864, 1897. Minnesota Historical Society. [P2662]

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“The Amount and Time of Payment of Bounty to New Recruits,” “The Draft,” and “Latest News,” Stillwater Messenger – November 24, 1863

Sunday, November 24th, 2013

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Letter from Charles Goddard of the 1st Minnesota to his mother about letters he’s received and rations – November 23, 1863

Saturday, November 23rd, 2013

Camp 1st Minn. Vols. near Culpeper Va Nov. 23d 1863.
Dear Mother
Not but a few days ago I wrote a line to you, but if my letters are as welcome to you as your letters are to me you will not care how often I write. I received three very interesting letters this evening, one from you, one from Camp Distribution Alexandria and one from Cousin Smith Goddard[,] Virginia City Nevada Territory[,] his letter is very interesting indeed , he is getting $4.00 per day, but dose not say at what, good carpenters are getting $6.00 per day, he says liveing is not so costly as one would suppose, flour $9.00 per hundred, beef a bit a pound as he calls it, butter 50 cts per pound[,] eggs $1.00 per dozen – poultry would pay at that price[.]
House rent is very high, a house with two rooms renting for 20.00 a month and some 25.00, some large business houses rent for one thousand Dollars, lots are worth from five hundred to ten thousand Dollars, they are in the City of Virginia of course, lots would not sell for that all ovr, with all he feels perfectly contented  and thinks that I had better come out there, but I am afraid he has colored the picture he gives of the country. I am very sory to hear of Uncle Jame’s misfortune – he will not take the view of it that Mrs. Fry does for he will think that it is necessary for some of the Soldiers to get “wiped out” and it was not necessary to have that foot hurt. I agree with him if he thinks so and if he don’t I am of that opinion any how, give him my respects. Tell Thomas Norton that if he would like to see me eating I would most heartily like to gratify his desire for you must remember that Goddard has gaind great notority as an eater, one thing sure an oyster supper (cost 2.00) cannot live long when my “bunkey” and myself get at it, perhaps you would like to know who my “bunky” is – well, he’s a regular “brick” all the way from Egypt Illinois and can eat purty near as much as I. We have had a few bad days, but it seems that it is just waiting until we got on the march and then it will come thick and strong. One of the boys of our Company that has been away ever since the time we left Camp Stone
Jerry Booker and Miss Short I consider a very poor match[.] I do not know as I can give any good reason for thinking so, but I think a goodeal such a match as Claperton & Lady.
We are getting a goodeal more to eat now than formerly, but still have to econemize to make rations last I guess the Gen. has thought best give us only 5 days rations to carry for the old order to keep 8 on hand has been countermanded and only 5 now. before we could not make the rations last from one issue to another[.]
Give my respects to all the Friends
Love to Brother
Orren and yourself
Chas E. Goddard


See entire letter here: 1863-11-23_Smith_complete

Citation: November 23, 1863, Letter from Charles Goddard to his mother, Correspondence 1863-1929. Smith, Orrin Fruit and Family Papers, 1829-1932. Minnesota Historical Society. [P1434 box 1]

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Kennedy Card

Friday, November 22nd, 2013

Kennedy Card

50 years ago today, November 22, 1963 President John F. Kennedy was killed during a stop in Dallas, Texas. This prayer card commemorates that day with a portrait of John F. Kennedy on the front with the text; “35th President of the United States / Born May 29, 1917 / Inaugurated January 20, 1961 / Died November 22, 1963″, and a quote from Saint Ambrose on the back; “We have loved him during life, let us not abandon him, until we have conducted him by our prayers into the house of the Lord.”

For details, view this card in our collections database.

(Note: The comments section has been temporarily disabled while we upgrade the website. You can always leave comments on our Flickr Photostream at http://www.flickr.com/photos/minnesotahistoricalsociety/)

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Letter from Charles Goddard of the 1st Minnesota to his mother about the paper shortage and late pay – November 22, 1863

Friday, November 22nd, 2013

Camp 1st Minn. Vols. Near Culpeper Va. Novr. 22d 1863.
Dear Mother[,] your kind letter of the 8 I received some time ago and owing to the want of paper, which has been very scarce as Gen. Mead will not allow the suttlers to come up to the army. I suppose because that some of them are disloyal and let the rebs get them with their loads of goods. I have been unable to write to you. Nothing of interest has happend since I last wrote excepting the payment of our Regiment owing to some error in the pay role of Company “K” I was unable to get more than 2 months pay and there was six dues me, but that will be attended to before next pay day.
I cannot send home any money this time because I had borrowed some and I had to pay those debts, amounting to about $18.00, some that I got of boy’s at Gettysburg and some of the boy’s in the Company. Next pay day I will be able to send you $50.00. We have had some weather lately that would use a fellow up pretty fast if he was camping out in shelter tents and we expect more of it, as this is fast about the time of year for mudy roads. Weather that in Minn you would consider bad indeed[.]
I have heard nothing from Charley Ely lately, but one of the boys received, a letter from William […] you about five days ago and he said Chas wanted to come back to the Regiment[.]
We hardly know what to think, wheather there will be a forward movement this fall again or not, but I can tell you if the men could have their say there would be little moveing this fall, and the idea of the correspondents writing that the men are anxious to go ahead and engage the rebs, get wiped out &C is all a humbug and I think if you should go all through the Army of evry man, that but few are anxious to go nite] a fight, but if it is necessary then they would be more willing, the Idea of whipping the rebels out of Richmond this fall is one of the ideas and then if we should compel the enemy to evacuate our front we would only be yelling farther from our base and land knows the bushwhackers cut off lots of our trains now what would they do if we should winter near Gordonsville[?] they could take possession of the road in our rear unless we put guards on it and we have not army aneugh to guard the rail Road that far[.]
Pleas give my love to Brother Orren F. Smith and Respects to all my Friends
Except this as an excuse for a letter[.]
Chas. E. Goddard
K Company 1st Minn


See entire letter here: 1863-11-22_Smith_complete

Citation: November 22, 1863, Letter from Charles Goddard to his mother, Correspondence 1863-1929. Smith, Orrin Fruit and Family Papers, 1829-1932. Minnesota Historical Society. [P1434 box 1]

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Herter’s Deer Master Deer Call

Thursday, November 21st, 2013

Herter’s Deer Master Deer Call

Herter’s No. 903 Deer Master Deer Call (.1) in its original two-piece pasteboard box (.2) with a thirty-two (32) page instruction booklet (.3) written by George Leonard Herter of Herter’s, Inc. in Waseca, Minnesota. The call is made from turned wood with a black plastic mouthpiece. The box reads, in part, “A CALL DESIGNED AND BUILT FOR THE REAL HUNTER WHO TAKES PRIDE IN FINE EQUIPMENT / HERTER’S WORLD FAMOUS GAME CALLS / SHOCK-PROOF / MOISTURE PROOF / PRECISION BACITE REED SEATS – PURE CHRONIL REEDS – PAT. PENDING”.

For details, view this deer call in our collections database.

(Note: The comments section has been temporarily disabled while we upgrade the website. You can always leave comments on our Flickr Photostream at http://www.flickr.com/photos/minnesotahistoricalsociety/)

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“The Ninth Minnesota,” “Latest News,” and “Southern News,” Saint Paul Daily Press – November 21, 1863

Thursday, November 21st, 2013

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Dan Murphy’s Les Paul Goldtop Guitar

Wednesday, November 20th, 2013

“It was really a home spun band with very humble beginnings”.  That’s how former Soul Asylum lead guitarist Dan Murphy described his Minneapolis-based band, which rose to superstardom in 1992 with their hit single “Runaway Train”.  A native of Duluth, Murphy co-founded the group in 1981 with Karl Mueller and Dave Pirner as a trio under the name Loud Fast Rules, playing in garages, at parties, and in local clubs including First Avenue.  With the addition of Pat Morley on drums, the band changed its name to Soul Asylum in 1984 and began recording albums for the independent record label Twin/Tone Records. Grant Young replaced Morley on drums shortly after their debut album, Say What you Will, and for the next nine years the band played hundreds of concerts across the United States and Europe, building a following of fans and climbing the college radio charts.  After releasing a string of tepidly-received albums under the A&M label, the band signed with Columbia Records in 1992 and released Grave Dancers Union to critical and popular acclaim. The album’s success catapulted Soul Asylum to international celebrity and assured their reputation for the next twenty years as one of the world’s most renowned independent rock bands.

Purchased in the mid 1980’s at Benedict’s Music Store in Minneapolis, Murphy used this Gibson Les Paul guitar on every Soul Asylum album, starting with 1988’s Hang Time, until his departure from the band in 2012.  Murphy also logged hundreds of performances on the guitar as a member of Soul Asylum and the supergroup Golden Smog, including appearances at President Bill Clinton’s first inaugural ball, the MTV Music Awards, “Saturday Night Live”, the “David Letterman Show”, and the “Tonight Show with Jay Leno”.  The guitar joins the Society’s extensive holdings of artifacts and manuscript materials which document both the storied legacy of Soul Asylum and Dan Murphy’s celebrated achievements as a Minnesota musician.

Adam Scher, Senior Curator

Photo by Daniel Schwen.

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Combination and dressing gown

Wednesday, November 20th, 2013

Combination and dressing gown

Combination and dressing gown with a large rose and foliage print in pink and aqua on a black ground. The combination has black lace trim down the front with three covered buttons and spaghetti straps. The knee-length dressing gown has a long shawl collar, a peplum, and a tie closure. Made of satin polyester. Designed by Monika Tilley. Made by Vassarette, a division of Munsingwear Incorporated, a company based in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

For details, view this combination in our collections database.

(Note: The comments section has been temporarily disabled while we upgrade the website. You can always leave comments on our Flickr Photostream at http://www.flickr.com/photos/minnesotahistoricalsociety/)

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“The News,” “The Pennsylvania Decision Against the Consription Act,” and “The Cincinnati Conspiracy,” Saint Paul Pioneer and Democrat – November 20, 1863

Wednesday, November 20th, 2013

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An Ounce of Preservation: A Guide to the Care of Papers and Photographs