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“Pregnant Angel” Halloween Costume

Thursday, October 31st, 2013

Halloween Costume

A photograph of a Minnesota woman wearing a “Pregnant Angel” Halloween costume in 1974.

For details, view this photograph in our collections database.

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“Who Removed the Winnebagoes?” “Something for Voters to Remember,” and “Latest News by Friday night’s mail,” Mankato Weekly Record – October 31, 1863

Thursday, October 31st, 2013

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Minneapolis postcard

Wednesday, October 30th, 2013

Minneapolis postcard

Postcard that reads “It may seem funny but — Minneapolis is a very fascinating town!!” and which has a blue felt “Minneapolis” banner attached. Circa 1920.

For details, view this postcard in our collections database.

And for more from the 1920s don’t miss:

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“The Situation of Affairs at the South: the Female Bread Riot at Mobile,” “Our Army Correspondence: The Fight at Bristow Station,” and “Letter from the Fourth Regiment,” Saint Paul Pioneer and Democrat – October 30, 1863

Wednesday, October 30th, 2013

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Dakota beaded jacket

Tuesday, October 29th, 2013

Dakota beaded jacket

Buckskin coat made by Dakota Indians and purchased by personnel of Camp Kamaji on Cass Lake, Minnesota in about 1910.

For details, view this jacket in our collections database.

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“Colonel Miller’s Speech,” “From the Second Battery,” and “Letter from New Orleans,” St. Cloud Democrat – October 29, 1863

Tuesday, October 29th, 2013

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Rainbow Postcard

Monday, October 28th, 2013

Rainbow Postcard

Souvenir “Minnesota’s Rainbow of Colors” postcard.

For details, view this postcard in our collections database.

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“The Re-Union,” “Shorter Chatechism of Negro Equality,” and “American vs. English Artillery,” Goodhue Volunteer (Red Wing) – October 28, 1863

Monday, October 28th, 2013

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“300,000 Volunteers Called for,” and “Slavery Passing Away in Missouri and Kentucky,” Stillwater Messenger – October 27, 1863

Sunday, October 27th, 2013

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William LeDuc and the opening of the Union “Cracker Line – October 26, 1863

Saturday, October 26th, 2013

The topographical map of part of northern Georgia and Tennessee pictured below belonged to Quartermaster William Gates LeDuc of Minnesota.

After the Battle of Chickamauga (September 19-20, 1863) the Union Army of the Cumberland was cut off from its supply lines by Confederate forces around Chattanooga, Tennessee. For the ensuing six weeks the Army’s condition grew increasingly dire. Near the end of October, 1863, Union forces launched a counterattack. Minnesota Colonel William G. LeDuc and Captain Arthur Edwards, both of the Quartermaster Corps, assembled and launched the steamboat, the USS Chattanooga, delivering rations and forage to starving Union troops and animals. This supply line was dubbed the “Cracker Line.”

Hardtack is a biscuit (or cracker, and thus the Cracker Line’s namesake) made from flour, water and salt. It was a staple of the Civil War soldier’s diet because it was inexpensive and, when properly stored, lasted for years. Hardtack, while nutritious, could be exceedingly hard and usually had to be soaked before it could be eaten.

Learn More:

Citations:
Quartermaster’s map of northern Georgia and Tennessee. 1988.217.6. Minnesota Historical Society.
Civil War hardtack. 65.202. Minnesota Historical Society.

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An Ounce of Preservation: A Guide to the Care of Papers and Photographs