Home / Collections / Podcast & Blog » 2013 » July

Collections

Collections Up Close

Archive for July, 2013

Ojibwa bandolier bag

Wednesday, July 31st, 2013

Ojibwa bandolier bag

Ojibwa bandolier bag with front pocket. Pocket panel of loomed seed beads has geometric motifs, is attached to cloth backing and features integrated tabs finished with wool yarn tassels. Panel above the pocket features a spot-stitched, embroidered floral motif. Loomed seed bead panels are attached to the cloth strap.

For details, view this bag in our collections database.

Bookmark and Share

“The First Minnesota: A Graphic Account of the Great Battle,” “Our Army Correspondence: Letter from a field officer of the Third Minnesota,” and “The Battle at gettysburg: Official Report of Capt. Henry C. Coates, Commanding” St. Paul Pioneer and Democrat – July 31, 1863

Wednesday, July 31st, 2013

Bookmark and Share

Suffrage banner

Tuesday, July 30th, 2013

Suffrage banner

Women’s suffrage banner. Contains yellow felt background with black felt block lettering reading “MORE/BALLOTS/LESS/BULLETS”. Banner has black felt tape across the top and a scalloped design across the bottom. Circa 1920.

For details, view this banner in our collections database.

Learn More:

Bookmark and Share

Letter from James Madison Bowler to his wife, Elizabeth Caleff Bowler, reporting on events in Arkansas – July 30, 1863

Tuesday, July 30th, 2013

Helena, Ark[ansas]., July 30th, 1863.
My Dear Libby:
[…]
It is cheering to me to learn that you begin to have some hope for the Union cause.  For my part I am not more sanguine of success to-day than I was in the darkest hour since the commencement of this conspiracy against the Gov’t.  I have always felt confident that the South would have to succumb sooner or later to the overwhelming forces of the North, or of the Gov’t rather.  Besides, Providence will never suffer a rebellion to succeed which has for its motives the propagation of so wicked a thing as slavery.  I feel as sure of that as I do that I am a living being.
[...]
Ever your loving husband,
Madison.

See whole letter here: 1863-07-30_Bowler_combined

Citation: July 30, 1863, Letter from James Madison Bowler to Lizzie, Correspondence, undated, 1829-1865. Bowler, James Madison and Family, Papers. Minnesota Historical Society. [P1330 box 1]

Bookmark and Share

Wood Brooch

Monday, July 29th, 2013

Wood Brooch

Oval brooch carved from a piece of the Charter Oak. The high relief, carved image is of a branch with two leaves and two flower buds of acorns. The reverse exposes the underside of the wood piece with is carved in low relief with the words “Mary Lee from Towny.”

For details, view this brooch in our collections database.

Bookmark and Share

Diary entry by Edward F Wright of the 7th Minnesota Infantry, Company H, participating in the Sibley Expedition against the Dakota Indians – July 29, 1863

Monday, July 29th, 2013

Wednesday July 29th 1863.
Reville at two am[,] started at four oclk [.] crossed Rabbit river on a pontoon boat[.] the stream is narrow but deep[.] the teams forded it. Some cavalry and artillery came on ahead this morning. after marching 12 miles we came in sight of the Mo [Missouri] river. there is some timber along the bank which is low bottom land on this (Dakota) side, but on the opposite side (Nebraska side) it is high bluffs. when we came within three or four miles of the river we heard the artillery at work shelling the Indians in the woods and on the high bluffs in Nebraska[.] we could see hundreds of Indians lineing the bluff for two miles or more, watching our train as it advanced towards the river. The train halted about half a mile from the timber.
The 6th Reg advanced as skirmishers into the woods. The 7th & 10th remained to guard the train, which halted about 11 am and stayed still until about 3 pm when it was ordered to go into camp on the Apple river some five miles south of where we struck the Mo river. It was very hotwhile the train was halted and several men were sun struck there (I was all day on account of the […])
The Artillery, Cavalry & 6th Reg Infantry kept up considerable fireing across the river and the Indian returned the fire but  I have not heard that any of our men were injured. The Indians put up a white flag, and made signs that they wanted to surrender to us. our men stopped fireing and gathered together to receive them, but they had no sooner got together when the treacherous foe sent a heavy volley of bullets at them, which fortunately did not quite reach our boys, who returned the fire with some effect, as they wounded some of them, if they did not kill any. They left a large number of wagons carts and other things on this side of the river which they had not time to get across before we overtook them. they swam their ponies across the river and made kind of rafts to take their famlies over. Lieut Bever or Gen Sibley’s staff and a man in the 6th Reg were missing at night and it is known they were in the woods during the fight and it is feard they have been killed & scalped. A cannon was fired several times and rockets sent up as signals for them to know where the camp is, if they are alive.


See the complete diary.

*Learn more about the U.S.-Dakota War of 1862, as well as its causes and consequences, by visiting this website or by viewing the exhibit at the Minnesota History Center.

Citation: July 29, 1863 Diary entry by Edward F. Wright. Edward F. Wright diary. Minnesota Historical Society. [RESERVE 149]
Pages 33-34

Bookmark and Share

“The News,” “The Riot,” and “Proclamation of the President,” Stillwater Messenger – July 28, 1863

Sunday, July 28th, 2013

Bookmark and Share

Diary entry by Matthew Marvin – July 27, 1863

Saturday, July 27th, 2013

Diary entry by Matthew Marvin, of the 1st Minnesota Regiment, written from the US General Hospital at Broad and Cherry Streets in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. On July 22nd Marvin remarks on a special treat: “At Noon to our surprise & great delight Mrs Ely & Mrs Smith of Winona came to see our State wounded & Co. [inpatients] it is all most imposeble to express the gratitude to the delegates[,] it was so unexpected”. Though Mrs. Smith’s son (Charles Goddard) seemed less pleased by his mother’s visit (see his letter dated July 26th), Marvin has nothing but good things to say.

Marvin’s wound continues to trouble him. He writes: “Went across the room on crutches to day & my wound commenced to bleed & marked the Isle their & Bak[.] it is very sore to nite & very painfull”.  On July 24th Marvin describes his pain in detail: “The pain many times in the day feels as though their was an Old Hen with 14 chichkens wer in my foot & the Hen scratching & pulling at the Nerves & the littles all run to the center find something then scatter for a while”.

The weather in Philadelphia turns hot and steamy and Marvin suffers all the more, writing: “there is No Air circulating through the rooms atall[.] Sent out & got some Ice Cream to cool off with” and “I have suffered as mutch from heat today as from the wound”.  On July 27, Marvin writes:
My wound has been the most quiet today that [it] has since I have been here[.] Sent out & got a [lat] of Ice cream to cool off[.] it is very warm[.] I am in the center of the Room that has about 270 patience[.]
Dr. Keiting says I can be transferred to Min as soon as I can stand it[.] Weather Rain[.]


See week’s worth of entries: 1863-07-27_Marvin_combined_7-21_7-28

Citation:  July 21-28, 1863 Diary entries by Matthew Marvin, Diary notes and memos. Matthew Marvin Papers. Minnesota Historical Society. [P2355 box 1]

Bookmark and Share

Spilled Milk

Friday, July 26th, 2013

Spilled Milk

An Ohleen Dairy Company delivery driver not crying over spilled milk.

Captured by a Minneapolis newspaper photographer on September 9, 1944.

For details, view this photograph in our collections database.

Bookmark and Share

Letter from Charles Goddard to his younger brother and uncle, reporting on his mother’s activities since her arrival in Philadelphia – July 26, 1863

Friday, July 26th, 2013

Broad and Cherry Street
Philadelphia
July 26th 1863
Dear Brother Orren
Mother is withe me, she is stoping at the hotell not far from here, she says you are out to Uncle John’s. and I know you are getting along fine for you must be a pretty brave boy by this time[.]
Mother is coming back to
Winona in a few days
Good by
Charley


Uncle JC
Mother desired me to write a few lines to Brother and knowing as I do that he is with you I take the liberty to direct in your name also to write a few lines to you[.]
Mother arrived here a few days ago, it surprised me very much indeed to see her comming up the steps in this ward[,] and Mrs Ely her companion[.] They have been distributing eatibles to the wounded 1st[.] wine: cake: jelly: &c[,] but it is against orders and I think they had better do as all the rest do that come here – give to the matron[.] they would not do that at first thinking the matron would not give it to the 1st Minn boys. The Matron gives to those that she has on her diet book and they ar soldiers that are wounded so bad they cant eat the regular grub that is served to us, so if a Minn boys happens to be on the diet book he will rec[eive] the same attention that any boddy does[.]
All of the boys out of our Company are getting along fine. Most all in this Hosp are slightly wounded[;] only a few bad or[,] as the Doctor calls them[,] “interesting cases”[.]
They are drafting in the city, now no body attempts to resist the draft.
There are about 700 Patiants in this Hospt, some 72 in this Ward. Mother and Mrs Ely went out to Chestnuts Hill Hospt looking up the Min boys yesterday, they found a good many names there and saw a good many of the Regt[.]
Tell Brother Mother desires him to be a good boy untill she comes back[.]
I thought I would write a few words so that he could read them, maby it will pleas him[.]
I recd a letter from Laird McCormic and he say’s that Aunt and Mr Miller are down to Gran-Father. Gran Father and Miller went as far as Harrisburg for state defence[.]
Nothing more at present[.]
With respect
CE Goddard
Respects to Aunt and Mrs Black
Love to Brother and Willie

See full letter: 1863-07-26_Smith_combined

Citation: July 26, 1863, Letter from Charles Goddard to his mother (Catherine Smith), Correspondence 1863-1929. Smith, Orrin Fruit and Family Papers, 1829-1932. Minnesota Historical Society. [P1434 box 1]

Bookmark and Share


An Ounce of Preservation: A Guide to the Care of Papers and Photographs