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“President Lincoln on Vallandigham and ‘Arbitrary Arrests’” and “How the English treat Rebels,” Stillwater Messenger – June 30, 1863

Sunday, June 30th, 2013

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Diary entries by Matthew Marvin of the 1st Minnesota Regiment, marching in the Army of the Potomac – June 29, 1863

Saturday, June 29th, 2013

The Army of the Potomac skirmishes with the Rebels in Haymarket, Virginia, then moves toward Leesburg on the Gum Spring Road, crossing the river into Maryland at Edwards Ferry.  The men march on toward Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, passing through Frederick and many other towns in Maryland along the way; see a map of the Army’s movements.

Marvin writes of the skirmish at the Battle of Haymarket on June 25th:
This morning about 6 o’clock The Rebell cavalry attacked our pickets & skirmishing continued for abot an hour[.] We fell in under arms expecting a skrimage at any moment[.] We stocked arms & packed up[,] ready to move at the word. Rumor says we shall go back to Leesburg[.] Started on the march & about 9 o clock the rebs opened on us from a hill[,] Wounding one man in 15th Mass & a piece of shell wounded the horse that Col Colville was riding[.] he had to abandon it[.] Battery A of the 4th Reg got in past & the men pulled of their Blouses & rolled up their sleeves & very soon mad the rebs skedaddle[.] rumor says they dismounted 2 of the rebs  cannon[…] Battery A is one of the best in the servace[.] They are most sure to silence any battery on which they open[.] Battery B of the 1st R.I. is not behind Battery A though the 1st shell they fired killed a man in the [14]th Me[,] Though I guess it was from some defect in the shell[.] soon after our Batteries opened we skedadded[.] Hay[market] is about one & half miles [back] […] it is a splendid country arround it[.] The soldier[s] completely striped the chery trees all along the road[.] some of the trees wer 3 ft through & 30 or 40 ft high & hung full of cherries[.] after we passed their was hardly a limb left f[r]om tip to [but.] It was supposed that […] we wer on the Gum spring Road though we changed to a half doz differant by roads as crooked as a rams horn[.] We reached Gum-spring about 8 o clock [some] tired as the day was Lowery & by 5 oclock the road had become soft & slippry & cloths nearly wet through[.]

The Army’s long march begins again on June 26th:
The drums sounding Reville waked me up[.] I found my stockings soked full & cloths wet through[.] we had barely time to make coffee and eat when the order came pack up fall in & march[…] We took the Leesburg road but soon cut around on by roads[.] camped on the hills oppaset Ed Ferry at 12 o’clock[.] everything wet through & mud to our knees[.] Packed up at dark[,] & went down to the river[,] layed in the mud till 11o’clock & crossed in to Maryland at Ed Ferry[.] Their was 66 Ponton boats 16 ft apart & 2 Bridges layed down about 1 o clock Am[…]

June 27th:
Started on the march at noon[.] took the same road that we marched one year & half ago[.] The roads wer very muddy & badly cut up with the wagons[…] The Brigade was badly strung out & tired out[.] on arriving at the camp the boys hooted[…] Had just got to sleep & had to get up & detail 16 [men] for picket[.] Their was a rite smart of swearing[...]

June 28th:
Started on the march about 9 oclock[.] The roads wer very good for Infantry but all most impassible for wagons[.] We crossed one creek whare we went in Singlee file[.] I[t] would of only taken 6 men half hour to fixed it all rite[.] We wer delayed 2 or 3 hours & then had to march harder to make up[.] We passed through Uurbana[*] about 12 o clock[.] camped in sight of Frederick city[*.] drew 2 days rations[.]
[*Urbana and Frederick, MD]

June 29th:
Started ½ pas[t] 8[.] passed on the South of Frederick[;] passed through Liberty[,] Johnsville Union[, …] & passed through Union Town[*] about a mile & camped at 9 o clock[.] it is the longest marche we ever had[.] Some of the citizen wer glad to see us[,] others wer not[.] The first 12 miles we marched in 4 hours & waded a creek that could be bridged in ½ an hour by ½ doz men[.] Gen Order complyments us & says we marched 30 miles[.] Rumor says that Mc is in command of the Army[.]
Weather Lowery Rain & pleasant[.]
Rumor says that McClellan has been Reinstated & they think it to good to be true but pray that it is so[.]
Marched 30 miles Union town[.]

[*Liberty (Libertytown), Johnsville Union (Union Bridge), and Union town (Uniontown), Maryland]

On June 30th Marvin get his last reprieve before marching north toward a looming battle in the small Pennsylvania town of Gettysburg.  He writes:

Layed in camp all day[...] Finished the Pay Rolls & mad the monthly Repo[rt.] had to lean against the fence & wrote on knapsack[;] it is rough[...] Drew two days rations[.]”  Though he does not yet know what in store for him, Marvin writes of his hope for the rest of his time in service: “I should like to serve the rest of my time in a state whare our services appear to be appreciated as here […].


See week’s worth of entries here: 1863-06-29_Marvin_6-23_6-30combined

Citation:  June 23-30, 1863 Diary entries by Matthew Marvin, Diary, January 1-December 31, 1863. Volume 2.  Matthew Marvin Papers. Minnesota Historical Society. [P2355 box 2]

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Letter from James Madison Bowler to his wife, Elizabeth Caleff Bowler, then residing in Nininger, Minnesota, reporting on the siege of Vicksburg– June 28, 1863

Friday, June 28th, 2013

Snyder’s Bluff, Miss, June 28, 1863
Sunday]
Dear Libby:
[…] It is very warm.  I never experienced anything like it before now.  […]
{Monday 29th} […] I have been down to the bayou and had a good wash this evening.  Saw one man get his leg bitten by an Alligator.  Quite a number have been bitten since we came here, one man killed. […]
{Tuesday 30th}  Have had Regt. inspection and muster to-day, and now have to work hard for a few days making out muster and Pay Rolls, quarterly returns, monthly returns, &c., &c.  The weather is intensely warm.  The 25th Wis. returned to camp to-day from up river, so our brigade is whole again.  Dr. Pride is here again, as crazy as ever.  We have pretty exciting news about Lee’s being in Penn., stirring up the stay-at-home Dutchmen and Copperheads.  I am glad to hear it. It will do good in the end, besides the rebels in that direction will get a whipping for once and find out that an offensive movement is a little more risky than the defensive which they have been so long practicing.
{Wednesday, July 1, 1863}
[…] Grant blew up two rebel fortifications to-day in front of Vicksburg, gaining considerable advantage.  Three darkies were blown over to our men — one of them alive. […]
{Wednesday, July 2nd}
Heavy firing is going on to-night at Vicksburg.  Wish you could hear it.  We expect sonething to be done on the 4th to celebrate the day.  The rebels are building flat boats prepatory to an attempt to cross the river and escape to Louisiana one of these dark nights.  The 5th Regt. is among the troops they would have to meet on the other side if they attempt to cross.  […]
{Saturday, July 4th, morning}
There has been a death-like silence at Vicksburg since 6 P.M. yesterday.  It may be the calm which precedes the storm.  We expect to hear some heavy work before night.  A National salute is just being fired at Youngs Point.  It is cloudy and gives promise of a cool day.  I should like to know how you are celebrating the 4th in Nininger.  (10 A.M.)  The magic words are spoken Vicksburg is ours.  Every heart is glad.  Over 150,000 men are at this moment rejoicing over the event.  The gordian knot which has held this great army here so long, is now cut, and this army, released from the spell which has bound it, is at liberty to do something to avert disasters threatened elsewhere — to re-enforce Hooker and drive Lee back to Virginia; pursue Johnston; re-enforce Rosecranz; or assist Banks to take Port Hudson — anyone or all of these things, we can do, as our authorities shall decide.  The rebel flag was hauled down and the white flag run up at 9 o’clock this morning.  The negociations (sic) were made last night, and our troops are at this moment in possession of the long-coveted rebel works.  Regiments are out in line hurrahing and innumerable bands are playing patriotic tunes.  Our Band, within ten feet of my tent, has played Hail Columbia, Dixie, and Yankee Doodle while I have been writing this.  It seems as though they never played better than now.  This 4th of July will be long remembered by us.  (Evening, 10 p.m.)  Twenty-two thousand rebels stacked their arms and surrendered to-day, besides the many sick and wounded.  It is a glorious victory.  Port Hudson must soon fall, and then the Mississippi is once more open, opened by the strong arm of the Northwest.  Sherman’s corps passed out past here this afternoon for Black river, with Pontoons.  About 20,000 Cavalry are in the rebels rear and with this army in front Johnston will have work enough.  Well I must bid you good-night.  Madison.


Citation:  June 28, 1863, Letter from James Madison Bowler to Lizzie, Correspondence, undated, 1829-1865. Bowler, James Madison and Family, Papers. Minnesota Historical Society. [P1330 box 1]

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Tote bag made from Pillsbury Feeds sack

Friday, June 28th, 2013

Tote bag made from Pillsbury Feeds sack

Tote bag made from a 100-pound sack of Pillsbury feed. Circa 1950-60.

For details, view this tote bag in our collections database.

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Letter from James Christie, stationed near Vicksburg, to his brother, Alexander Christie, commenting on General Grant – June 27, 1863

Thursday, June 27th, 2013

Mistake[:] Walnut Hills in rear of Vicksburgh.
right[:] Fort Hill Vicksburgh, June 27th 1863.
My very Erudite Brother [Alex], I havemade a slight mistake in the Localiseing of the date of this letter, So hear I make the amend honorable, By informing you that Walnut Hills are on our extreme right, and only partially occupied, By a small part of our forces.
[… page 3]
Gen U.S. Grant, was all round the central line of the camp yesterday. he was in our gun room, and from his manner you would have thought him a very unpretending Private. he was very thoughtful, and I think he is working out some Plan to raise the Devil with secesh, for a few words exchanged between him and one of this staff hinted as much. The flock around him are very social also, But more careful, of themselves than Grant, he smoked and smokes very much. […]
Believe me your affectionate Brother
William G Christie.


See whole letter here: 1863-06-27_Christie_combined

Citation: June 27, 1863, Letter from James Christie to his brother Alexander, Civil War correspondence, May 1863-February 1864. James C. Christie and Family Papers, 1823-1849. Minnesota Historical Society. [P1281 box A]

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Star Wars 8-track

Thursday, June 27th, 2013

Star Wars 8-track

8-track cartridge containing the soundtrack to Star Wars, 1977.

For details, view this 8-track in our collections database.

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“The Third Regiment,” “Our Army Correspondence: Letter from Vicksburg,” and “Fredericksburg: Our Color Guard at Mary E. Heights,” Saint Paul Pioneer & Democrat – June 26, 1863

Wednesday, June 26th, 2013

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Bob Hope in Minnesota

Wednesday, June 26th, 2013

Bob Hope in Minnesota

Bob Hope and some fans in town for the 1949 Aquatennial.

Captured by a Minneapolis newspaper photographer on July 22, 1949.

For details, view this photograph in our collections database.

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Diary entry by Edward F. Wright of the 7th Minnesota Infantry, Company H, participating in the Sibley Expedition against the Dakota Indians – June 25, 1863

Tuesday, June 25th, 2013

Thursday June 25.
Broke camp at 6 o’clk, marched 12 miles over a high stony prairie & at noon camped on the bank of Swan Lake and about two miles south of Big Stone lake. Some of the Cavalry men killed a Buffalo Bull today. The boys caught a large number of fish in the lake. Prayer meeting this eve. Had a good swim in Swan Lake.


See the entire diary.
*Learn more about the U.S.-Dakota War of 1862, as well as its causes and consequences, by visiting this website or by viewing the exhibit at the Minnesota History Center.
Citation: June 25, 1863 Diary entry by Edward F. Wright. Edward F. Wright diary. Minnesota Historical Society. [RESERVE 149]

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Dakota beaded leather moccasins

Tuesday, June 25th, 2013

Dakota beaded leather moccasins

Pair of dark brown, sinew-sewn leather beaded moccasins with rawhide sole. Made in the 1890s.

For details, view these moccasins in our collections database.

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An Ounce of Preservation: A Guide to the Care of Papers and Photographs