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Embossing stamp

Monday, May 20th, 2013

Embossing stamp

Cast iron embossing stamp used by the Minnesota Historical Society. The stamp features a hinged handle, a brass insert with the official MHS seal, a painted finish, gold filigree, and floral flourishes. Created and used no earlier than 1849.

For details, view the stamp in our online collections database.

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Letter from James Madison Bowler to his wife Lizzie (Elizabeth) regarding his recent payment and instructions to have her photograph taken – May 20, 1863 Fort Heiman, Ky., May 20th, 1863.

Monday, May 20th, 2013

Dear Lizzie:
I am at last able to send you something more substantial than promises.  Enclosed please find Two hundred dollars ($200.00).  I was paid to-day, the Paymaster having returned to this place to pay the 111th Illinois, and I taking advantage of his presence to get a little pay for myself I promised your father enough to pay his indebtedness to Mr. Russell.  Please let him have it if there is more than you need for your own use. Also remember to pay Aunt Sarah with all the interest she desires and my thanks into the bargain.
Now, you must go to St. Anthony on a visit, and to St. Paul to have your photograph (a dozen good ones) taken.  Do you hear?  I shall not take “No” for an answer.  Love to all.
Ever yours, Madison.


Citation:  May 20, 1863, Letter from James Madison Bowler to Lizzie, Correspondence, undated, 1829-1865. Bowler, James Madison and Family, Papers. Minnesota Historical Society. [P1330 box 1]

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“How would the North be able to Govern the South if Victorious?” “Vicksburg,” and “Copperhead Items,” Stillwater Messenger – May 19, 1863

Sunday, May 19th, 2013

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Letter from Charles Goddard of the 1st Minnesota to his mother – May 18, 1863

Saturday, May 18th, 2013

Falmouth Depot Va
May 18th 1863
Dear Mother, your kind letters dated the 30th April 3rd May 5 do and one dated the 11th came duly to hand this evening[.] The ones dated 30 April 3d and 5th May has been without doubt been misplaced and faild to come through as quick as the one dated 18th.
Henry Boyson has returned from his furlough, and he looks fine, as if he had enjoyed himself[.] He came to me and told me he was very sorry that he could not fetch the things you wanted to send, he had so much he could not carry all the things and as his time was fast going he could not bother with a [trinket.] I am very much obliged to kind mother for the things you would have sent had you the chance[.] I am getting along fine here[,] we are not over 40 rods from the Depot where all the Army Supplys come too and can most any moment walk down and buy what little things we need.  it may be a little crowded but a Soldier can soon get through a crowd if his education befitting a Soldier is complete.  again I thank you very much for what you would have sent[,] also my sincere thanks to Mrs. Neff for her interest in my wellfare.  Pleas give my thanks to Matthew and Thomas Norton[,] Aunt Mary Jane[,] Uncle Will and to all[.]  tell them that I and as thanktful as if I had recd the good things[.]  Tell Albert Moss and Henry Dale that I send them my very best wishes for their future welfare[.]  How you came to get their pictures is a mystery in my mind. Charley Ely and myself thought them lost[.] He did not put them in the office[.] I nor any one in our tent did not and when they were missing we thought them stolen, as their was a letter with five Dollars inclosed in it close by the pictures. I think some person put them in the office thinking to do us a favor. The pictures were very poor and I thought I would not have any taken but Charley wanted one to send home and he being too dark to take good we got them taken to gather, you can see in the one you have got that the man was in a great hurry, he painted the parts before the picture was dry consiquently the paints look streaked.  All I want now is that mock tie and then don’t put your self to any more trouble on my account[.]  I don’t need any thing more at presant.  You may not think the excuse I give for Henry not taking those things a good one but to tell the truth let Henry [beg] whare he may and they ask him any favor and he cannot refuse when he had ought for their sake as well as his own[.] he is one of that good naturd kind of boys that is willing but still not able to do any body favors.  I would like to know how you get along with that lot of yours, have you got the taxes all paid and evry thing strait[?]
Orren wrote me a little letter not long since and I failed to answer it[.]
Here
Dear Brother Orren
I Got your nice little letter a good while ago and it was a nice one
Your Brother Chas Goddard

See full letter here: 1863-05-18_Smith_combined

Citation: May 18, 1863, Letter from Charles Goddard to his mother, Correspondence 1863-1929. Smith, Orrin Fruit and Family Papers, 1829-1932. Minnesota Historical Society. [P1434 box 1]

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Humphrey as pitcher

Friday, May 17th, 2013

Humphrey the pitcher

Minneapolis Mayor Hubert H. Humphrey throws out the first pitch for the Minneapolis Millers at Nicollet Park. Captured by a Minneapolis newspaper photographer on April 27, 1948.

For details, view the photograph in our online collections database.

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Diary entries by Matthew Marvin and “The Censorship,” “Incidents in the Army of the Potomac during the Late Battles,” and “The Wounds of Gen. Jackson,” St. Paul Daily Press – May 17, 1863

Friday, May 17th, 2013

Diary entry by Matthew Marvin of the 1st Minnesota Regiment, written from the 1st Minnesota’s camp near the Rappahannock River at Falmouth, Virginia.  During the past week camp life has been dull.  Marvin writes that “Their is nothing going on” and “Idelness is distruction to an army”.  But the boys keep themselves entertained.  Marvin remarks that “poker playing is [initiating] its self into the rotine of camp amusements” and, on May 16th, “For a little excitement to day the Officers mad up a [purse] of $17.50 for a foot race”.

On Sunday May 17, Marvin writes:
Was on Co Inspection & on Dress parade[.]  I have been unwell for a couple of days With dull headache & my appetite is not as good as usual[.]  The days pass wearly by when there is nothing to do[.]  Weather plasant[.]


See the week of Marvin’s diary entries: 1863-05-17_Marvin_5-12-17combined

Citation:  May 12-17, 1863 Diary entries by Matthew Marvin, Diary, January 1-December 31, 1863. Volume 2.  Matthew Marvin Papers. Minnesota Historical Society. [P2355 box 2]

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Letter from the Assistant Adjutant General Thomas M Vincent to Governor Alexander Ramsey regarding the appointment of hospital stewards – May 16, 1863

Thursday, May 16th, 2013

War Department
Adjutant General’s Office
Washington, D.C., May 16th, 1863.

His Excellency,
The Governor of Minnesota
St. Paul, Minn.

Sir:
I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 7th Inst, asking if you have authority to appoint Hospital Stewards to the various Regiments of Minn Vols, and stating that Captain Nelson U.S.A. had refused to muster into service as Hospital Steward, Private Chamberlain, 8th Minn Vols, who had been so appointed.
In reply I have to inform you, that Hospital Stewards, are members of the Non-commissioned Staff of a Regiment, and as such the appointment is in the hands of the Commanding Officer of the Regiment, who alone can exercise the appointing power.

I am, Sir,
Very Respectfully,
Your Obedient Servant,
Thomas M Vincent
Assistant Adjutant General


Citation: May 16, 1863, Letter from Thomas M Vincent, Letters Received–AGO-QMG. Minnesota: Governor: Ramsey. Records. Minnesota Historical Society. State Archives. Minnesota Historical Society. [111.E.20.4F]

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Confederate flag captured at the Battle of Jackson, Mississippi and a letter from Jerome Farnsworth of the First Minnesota Regiment, Company “G”, to his mother – May 14, 1863

Thursday, May 16th, 2013

Confederate flag captured by the 4th Minnesota

Transcription in part: Mother you said you was down harted [.] Now Ma I just tell you that you must not get discouraged for everything will be well [.] after all Ma you must remember that your boys is not dead nor there is not any danger of their dying but remember that they are fighting for to put this Horrible Rebellion down and to save our Country and for my part I never want to come home untill it is accomplished...[ Jerome Farnsworth died on July 5, 1863, from wounds received at the Battle of Gettysburg.]

See full letter here: 1863-05-14_Farnsworth_combined

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Table from John’s Place

Thursday, May 16th, 2013

Table from John's Place

Table used between 1945 and 1960 at John’s Place (Yuen Faung Low), a Chinese restaurant in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Opened in 1883 as the Canton Cafe, it was the first Chinese restaurant in the state. The table features floral and bird mother-of-pearl marquetry on its legs, apron and the frame around the off-white marble slab top. The square columnar legs terminate in block feet; the apron incorporates Chinese ideograms into its inlay.

For details, view the table in our online collections database.

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“More of What the Soldiers Say,” “Correspondence: From a Soldier” in “Camp near Fredericksburg,” and “Late News,” The Republican, Preston – May 15, 1863.

Wednesday, May 15th, 2013

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An Ounce of Preservation: A Guide to the Care of Papers and Photographs