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Newspaper delivery by pony in Maplewood

Friday, February 22nd, 2013

Newspaper delivery by pony in Maplewood

A young woman delivers the Star Journal Tribune newspaper to 1083 Gordon Avenue in Maplewood, Minnesota. Captured by a Minneapolis newspaper photographer on June 20, 1946.

For details, view the photograph in our online collections database.

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“Latest News,” and “Foreign News,” St. Paul Daily Press – February 22, 1863

Friday, February 22nd, 2013

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Child’s dress

Thursday, February 21st, 2013

Child's dress

Child’s size 2 printed cotton dress with a star and dot print made and worn during the 1860s. The dress has a plain bodice with a square, wide neckline, ruffled cap sleeves and a back button closure. The full skirt is gathered at the waist and the bodice is lined in white cotton. This was the first short dress worn by Genevieve Ives Schwarg of Dodge Center, Minnesota, a teacher and librarian active in the women’s suffrage movement.

For details, view the dress in our online collections database.

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Letter to Governor Alexander Ramsey from Adjutant General Rosecrans discussing deserters – February 21, 1863

Thursday, February 21st, 2013

From Murfreesboro 21st Feby 1863.
To Gov Ramsey
Saint Paul Minn.
I think it due to those who suffer in the field as well as those who foot the bills at home, and run the risk of being called out to defend home. And national life that all deserted should be returned to duty, all citizens are interested in this. Those who oppose it favor perjury and rascality because a man who agreed to serve his Country takes wages and even bounty money and violates his oath of Service by deserting, is a perjurer, and rascal, and probably a coward, why should not the Legislature pass a law disfranchising, and disqualifying from every evidence all deserted as for other infamous crimes? (Signed)
W.S. Rosecrans
Maj. Genl Comdg


Citation:  February 21, 1863, Letter from Adjutant General Rosecrans, Letters Received–Other Higher Commands. Minnesota: Governor: Ramsey. Records. Minnesota Historical Society. State Archives. Minnesota Historical Society. [111.E.20.4F]

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Letter from Charles Goddard of the 1st Minnesota to his mother listing battles he’s been in and clearing up misunderstandings – February 20, 1863

Wednesday, February 20th, 2013

Camp Near Falmouth Va
February 20th 1863
Dear Mother
I received your kind letter of the 3rd and 6th of Feb this morning. You desired me to give you list of battles I have been in, they are as follows. The first engagement was the battle of Fair Oaks on the 31st May and 1st of June[.] The battle in the Peach Orchard[,] Savage Station[,] and White Oaks Swamp June 29th to 29th June 30th.
This ends the Peninsula campaign. Then we came to Md and fought the battle of Antietam[.] from thence we came here and fought the battle of Fredricksburg Sept 17th and December 13[.] These are the battles I have been in but not all the skirmish[.] I have been in the following skirmish opposite Edwards Ferry[,] York Town[,] Berryville[,] West Point[,] Malverin Hill under artilry fire 4 hours and then coming from the 2nd battle of Bull Run[.] on our retreat to Washington we formed a V across the road and repelled the Rebble Cavalry that was following up the rear of our army. There is a good many little places that I do not remember and if I get home before I forget them I will most likely tell you them[.] I have been evry whare the Regt has been excepting 1st Bull Run and I came near killing myself trying to get there so I do not think I am to blame for not getting there. Mother[,] “If you have been led to believe by my betters that I am very anxious to get home before the Rebellion is crushed[,] or that in the hasty letters I have written you, that I thought the soldier’s life a hard one, it is something I never intended to do. I acknowledge we do have some hard times, and that if we would give way to the impulses of a moment, a fellow would feel as if he could work for any boddy but uncle Sam[,] But when we get in camp and have time to get a cup of warm coffee and a slice of corn beef – or more commonly called “salt horse” – he feels as if he might stand it a very little while longer[.] Tell Uncle James that nothing would pleas me better than to hear that old Langdon had been ducked by the citizans of Winona[.] if Co. K wer only there he would not only get plucked but he might some fine day have the pleasure of rideing on the soft sid of a rough rail.
[…]
Mother I can assure you I never intended to hint in any of my letters that your letters are tedious, but on the contrary it gives me great pleasure to read them and nothing I like better than long ones. I am such a poor hand to write news or any thing interesting that I thought such long ones might not interest you[.] There are at the present in our Regt about 400 men fit for a march and in our Company we draw rations for 39 men and generly 1 or 2 of these are on the sick report.
[…]
Give my best respects to all of my friends and love to Brother Orren
Goodby Chas. E. Goddard

See whole letter: 1863-02-20_Smith_combined

Citation: February 20, 1863, Letter from Charles Goddard to his mother, Correspondence 1853-1862. Smith, Orrin Fruit and Family Papers, 1829-1932. Minnesota Historical Society. [P1434 box 1]

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1860s washing machine

Wednesday, February 20th, 2013

1860s washing machine

Mechanical washing machine used as a demonstration model by salesman Nickolas Wanes of Rice Lake, Wisconsin during the 1860s.

For details, view the washing machine in our online collections database.

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Minnesota Inventions on tpt!

Tuesday, February 19th, 2013


In case you missed it last Friday, our very own Adam Scher was on Almanac talking about Minnesota Inventions. Watch it here:

http://www.mnvideovault.org/index.php?id=24231&select_index=6&popup=yes#6

For more on Minnesota’s food innovations, see our Inventions of Champions: How Minnesotans Changed Breakfast podcast.

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Crew of the Lady Marge

Tuesday, February 19th, 2013

Crew of the Lady Marge

The crew of the B-29 bomber “Lady Marge” pose next to their aircraft during a visit to Minnesota. The crew flew documents finalizing the surrender of Japan at the end of World War II to Washington D.C. on September 1, 1945. During the flight they averaged 285 miles per hour, setting a world record for a flight from Honolulu to Washington. Captured by a Minneapolis newspaper photographer in October of 1945.

For details, view the photograph in our online collections database.

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“News and Rumors from the Minnesota First,” Rolls of Honor,” and “A Battle Expected Soon Between Rosecrans and Bragg,” St. Paul Daily Press – February 19, 1863

Tuesday, February 19th, 2013

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Letter from Charles Goddard of the 1st Minnesota to his mother about receiving a shirt and socks and sending a china tea cup – February 18, 1863

Monday, February 18th, 2013

Camp Near Falmouth Va
February 10th 1863
Dear Mother,
Mr Ross has just arrived from Washington and brings with him a shirt and pr socks from you for my humble self[.] I see in this no such a one as you described in your lette, but one that I would prefer above all others[.] I am very much obliged to you for your kindness not only this time but for ever since I have been in the service. Sam Stebbins had an express box come to this camp for him, but Sam having had his discharge some time previous to the arrival of the box[,] our Orderly Sargent requestd his [clirck] to write to Sam and find out what should be done with the things in the box[.] Sam replied that he would like me to have some of the things and the remainder should be distributed to “K. Co.” I took 2 shirts[,] one towel[,] knife and fork out of the box and the shirts was first class to[o] you can bet[.] so you see this with your thoughtfulness and Sams kindness there will be no need of me going without a shirt. Mr. Ross leaves us tomorrow morning for Washington and is going to take withe him a box from Co “k” to there friends in Winona[.] it will of course have to be a small one for he cannot carry a very large one. On his arrival at Winona he will leave this box at Randels harness shop and all those who have things in the box will call there for them[.] I am going to send you a little tea cup. I do not think it is china but very fine stone ware[.] I could of got some very fine china if I only had thought. The way I came to get this one I was in one of those first class Virginia closets looking for some butter but could not find any but one of my comrads was more fortunate and sang out to me to make haste or I would not get any, they ran out doors with the jar of butter and I after them but when I looked in my haversack for something to put the butter in it struck me pretty forceably that I ought to have something like a cup[,] so I told Bill Sargeant[,] who was going in to the house again[,] to fetch me out a cup so he fetched me this one and I filled it with butter and did eat butter and flap jacks untill I was filled. This is the only relic I fetched from Fredricksburg of that kind.
Ely is all on the nip up and in fine spirites[.]
There is a rumor in camp that the 7th Regt is going to relieve this Regt now if that is the case it wont be bad thing for us[.]
Mother there is no use in sending stamps in your letters for I have sent on and got them from Washington[.] My love to Brother Orren and yyourself[.] Goodby Chas. E. Goddard


Citation: February 18, 1863, Letter from Charles Goddard to his mother, Correspondence 1853-1862. Smith, Orrin Fruit and Family Papers, 1829-1932. Minnesota Historical Society. [P1434 box 1]

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An Ounce of Preservation: A Guide to the Care of Papers and Photographs