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Mary Hill’s comb

Thursday, February 28th, 2013

Mary Hill's comb

Sterling silver comb owned and used by Mary T. Hill, wife of the railroad magnate and businessman James J. Hill, between 1860 and 1880. The comb is engraved with her name.

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“Legislature of Minnesota,” “War News,” and “General Burnside,” Chaska Valley Herald – February 28, 1863

Thursday, February 28th, 2013

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Vulcan Krewe, 1946

Wednesday, February 27th, 2013

Vulcan Krewe, 1946

Two members of the Vulcan Krewe take a police officer hostage during the 1946 St. Paul Winter Carnival. The Krewe is a fraternal organization whose members are elected on a yearly basis and participate in charitable, promotional and theatrical activities associated with the Carnival. The image was captured by a Minneapolis newspaper photographer on February 22, 1946.

For details, view the photograph in our online collections database.

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Letter from Charles Goddard of the 1st Minnesota to his mother about pickets, weather, and army life – February 27, 1863

Wednesday, February 27th, 2013

Camp Near Falmouth
February 27th / 63
Dear Mother
I received your kind letter of the 11th of this month this morning. We have been having some very disagreeable weather of late, snow and rain continuly. We was on picket the 23rd on the banks of the Rappahannoc, this river is not a very wide nor is it very deep but its bottom is stony and it runs rapid so that it cannot be forded very easy only in certain places.
The rebel pickets sat on the other side and our pickets on this side I should judge not ove[r] a hundred yards from each other, but we are not allowed to communicate with them in any way, it hardly seems possable that the north and south could shout one another down, but how different in battle evry man is ready the minute forward is given to give Mr Reb the best shot in the wheel house. There has been some talk of our Regt going up whare the 7th is now but I guess that is all humbug, it would not be a bad thing for us, we would like the change very well. I suppose that when I get home Winona will look as if brick had been [ra…ed] pretty freely, but then I will always know Winona for if I cannot tell it by the building, I can by the ground the houses stand on(They are giving out furloughs to the men in the army but they are for only fifteen days and you know that it would hardly pay us Minn boys to get them for we could only get there when we would have to turn around and come back, without getting the worth of our money. it would cost about $20.25 to go and the same to come back and I could not afford that[.]
Mother I rather think if I were you I would not keep boarders if you can get along without[,] but then I suppose you know best what to do[.] Pleas give my respects to Mrs. [Frain] tell her I like soldiers life very well excepting the grub.
If you see Mrs Black give her my best respects[.]
Tell Cousin Franky that I want to know how she gets along[.] Remember me to Coz Hellen
Love to Brother Orren and a big share to your self[.]
C.E. Goddard
“K”



Citation: February 27, 1863, Letter from Charles Goddard to his mother, Correspondence 1853-1862. Smith, Orrin Fruit and Family Papers, 1829-1932. Minnesota Historical Society. [P1434 box 1]

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Toy refrigerator

Tuesday, February 26th, 2013

Toy refrigerator (closed)Toy refrigerator (open)

Tin refrigerator and freezer toy set with door handles, a painted floor grill and a name plate fixed to the upper right corner reading, “Frost Free/ Wolverine/ Refrigerator.” The inside doors of both the freezer and refrigerator feature lithographed illustrations of various foods. Manufactured by the Wolverine Toy Company and used by Nancy McCarty in the Midway neighborhood of St. Paul during the early 1970s.

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“Latest News,” and “From New York,” St. Paul Daily Press – February 26, 1863

Tuesday, February 26th, 2013

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Civil War doctor’s medicine case

Monday, February 25th, 2013

Civil War doctor's medicine case

Leather medicine case used by Javan B. Irvine during the Civil War. The case is stamped “Physician’s Pocket Companion” and contains twenty-one glass bottles with corks. Irvine enlisted with the 1st Minnesota Volunteer Infantry Regiment on April 29, 1861, and fought in the First Battle of Bull Run. He was commissioned as a First Lieutenant in the Thirteenth United States Infantry in 1861.

For details, view the case in our online collections database.

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“Shooting Deserters,” War News,” “What we have done, and what the Rebels have done,” and “How the Soldiers Feel,” Rochester Republican – February 25, 1863

Monday, February 25th, 2013

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“Death of Capt. Jas. W. Gorman,” “The First Regiment,” and “Must the War Stop?” Stillwater Messenger – February 24, 1863

Sunday, February 24th, 2013

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Diary entry by Matthew Marvin – February 23, 1863

Saturday, February 23rd, 2013

Diary entry by Matthew Marvin of the 1st Minnesota Regiment, written from the 1st Minnesota’s camp at Stafford Hills near Falmouth, Virginia. During the past week, between bouts of boredom when he “Played chess to kill time” because there was “nothing stiring in camp”, Marvin remarks that “The Lt Col commanding mad three or four Boches and once got us tangled up so that he had to mak ½ doz Non military movements to get us untangled[.] When any thing of that kind occurs you can hear the expression from the boys [‘]Oh to God that we had Sully or Dana to command us again[’.]”

The weather has produced a wintery mix in Virginia from rain to slush, generating a frozen crust on the ground after cold nights. Marvin writes of shenanigans in camp on the 17th due to the weather: “the boys got to throwing Snow balls[.] the guard turnd out to stop them but they got peppered with them[.] 5 or 4 got in the gard house”. And Union soldiers aren’t the only ones involved in mischief—days later while on picket duty, Marvin observes that “The rebs have a strong picket and keep a good fire on the picket line[.] Their was about a regt of the rebs turned out and had a general snow ball which continued about 2 hours[.] I reckon they had a rite smart time by the yelling[.] from the hill we could see them planely”.

On Monday the 23rd Marvin writes: “Gen police recd orders to go on picket to morrow[.] Comenced to mak the muster Rolls[.] Weather pleasant[.]” The next day, Marvin and the regiment return to picket duty and receive new instructions related in the Adjutant General’s Circular of February 16, 1863. Marvin says:

[.] Their is 1st a grand reserve and 200 yds in front is the picket reserve and 150 yds in front of them is the picket and 10 yds in front is the out post which consists of one man and is releaved every two hours[.] the picket post consists of 3 men which releave the out post[.] The picket are releaved by their reserve every 6 hours and the reserve by the Grand reserve so that the picket go from their post to grand reserve[.] We releave the 49 Pa or [Taminy][.] Their was strict orders against having fires except in the day and then only long enough to cook coffee[.]

See whole week of diary entries by Marvin: 1863-02-23_Marvin_combined_15-24

Citation: February 15-24, 1863 Diary entries by Matthew Marvin, Diary notes and memos. Matthew Marvin Papers. Minnesota Historical Society. [P2355 box 1]

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