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General Order regarding General Edwin Vose Sumner and a letter from Charles Goddard – January 26, 1863

Saturday, January 26th, 2013

General Order relieving General Edwin Vose Sumner of service and offering praise for the 1st Minnesota:

Hd Qrs Rt Gd Division
Camp near Falmouth Va Jany 26th 1863
General Order No 1
In pursuance of Genl Order No 20 from the Adjt Genls office War Dept Washington Jan 25th 1863, I announce to the Right Guard Division that I have been relieved from duty in the army of the Potomac by order of the Presidnt of the United States[.]
I have only to recall to you the memory of the past in which you have fought so many battles with credit and honor always; in which you have captured so many colors, without loosing a single gun or standard, and to urge that keeping this recollection in your hearts you prove always worthy of it. It is only in so doing that you can retain for yourselves a reputation well won and which I feel will be preserved under the gallant and able commander Maj Genl. Couch to whom I confide you
(sd) E. V. Sumner
Bvt. Maj Genl. U.S.A.
Official
F. W. Haskell
A.A.A.G.


Citation:  January 26, 1863, General Order No. 1, 1st Minnesota Infantry, 1861-63, p. 88-89. Minnesota: Adjutant General. Records. Minnesota Historical Society. State Archives. [109.K.14.4F]

Letter from Charles Goddard to his mother:
Programme
No 2d
Monday evening Jan 26th 163
Well Mother[,] We have been out on picket and we had a very good time to what I expected to have[.] The fore part of yesterday was a little rainy but cleard off about noon. We signed the pay rool to day and we will most likely get paid tomorrow, but they say it is only for 2 months and we should receive five months pay. I do not see how that is when there has been such a howl about the soldiers not getting there pay, I understood that all troops bothe in they Navy and land force that we serving under Uncle Sam would get paid up to the 1st day Jan 1863 by the 15th but it seems that the pay master  had not even comenced paying at the 15th nor dose he when he comes to pay us up the 1st of Jan[.]  I realy believe that the pay master takes the 2 months pay which is due us and turns it out as interest[.] he would reap a rich harvest loaning what would pay a Brigade or Division off, each man receiving $26.00 besides Teamsters they get pay for evry duty and then the officers they get quite a sum[.]
Mother I am afraid if we only receive $26.00 thro pay day I cannot send much home to you. I have been geting a good many little things at the Sutler, more than I have got before in a long time[.] I got a pare of gloves there that cost $2.00 besides writing material blackening penns and ink in camp we are always obliged to get blackning and black our shoes on dressperrade and inspections. I think you said in one of your letters that you had a little left in the bank in Winona so if you can use that till next pay day I can send you more then most likely as I have got gloves and cap and plenty of paper and ink. I wonder if you would like to know what we do evry day[,] Well I will tell you. first the bugals sound reveille and then the drums beat and we fall into line and answer to our names, then at 8 oclock comes sick call, and any body that wants a sick leave or som medacin then is his time for after that he cant get any unless he is so sick that the doctor has to be called. after sick call comes police. There is a detail maid out of each Company to clean the streets and when the call blows they turn out and sweep up the streets in fine stile. after breakfast (breakfast comes after poliece) comes guard movmt and after guard movmt comes drill call, then the Company turns out and drills untill recall is sounded, then we break ranks and scatter. At noon there is a call blowed for the Orderly Sargent to report to the Ajutants quarters, then there is nothing goes on untill the drill call sounds in the afternoon, then some times we have batallion drill and some times Company drill and a good many times no drill at all, then at sun down the assembly is blowed by the bugalers and then we have a dressperade.  We have our regular turn at guard picket Brigade guards and Brigade extra duty. These are the duties of a Soldier in camp, but I can tell you it is some diferent on a march where a fellow has to stop at night after a long days march and cook his grub[.] that’s what grinds me[;] a great many wer so tired they would not stop to cook any thing but would lay down and in a few minutes be fast a sleep.
Have you heard any thing from Gran Father lately[?] I wonder if Aunt Lucretia keeps hous for him or Aunt Mary. I suppose they are bothe at home yet or is Aunt Mary married[?] If she has been I have never heard any thing about it[.] I never hear any thing about Uncle Allison [Wonts] and Aunt Lib, they are most likely in Clinton Co Clinton Ville Pa[.] That was the first place I ever saw soldiers, and I always wanted to be one but it is plaid out, nothing very charming about a Soldier now as I can see, or a Soldiers life. I do not mean to say I would like to give it up now, if they will give us some body to lead us I will try and stick my term out, say little McClellen, he is the man for me and my candid opinion is the Army of the Potomac will never amount to any certain sum, untill he leads it, then the men would do all in there power to win a victory if it wer possable[.]


See whole letter: 1863-01-26_Smith_combined

Citation: January 26, 1863, Letter from Charles Goddard to his mother, Correspondence 1853-1862. Smith, Orrin Fruit and Family Papers, 1829-1932. Minnesota Historical Society. [P1434 box 1]

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1960 Bob Dylan recording

Friday, January 25th, 2013

1960 Bob Dylan recording

A recording made by Bob Dylan known as the Minnesota Party Tape. The recording features Dylan singing and playing the guitar with a group of his friends: Bil Golfus, Bonnie Beecher, Cynthia Fisher and Cleve Pettersen. Fisher sings with him on “Come See Jerusalem.” Recorded by Cleve Pettersen at an apartment (possibly rented by Hugh Brown) on 15th Avenue Southeast, Minneapolis in the fall of 1960. Pettersen used a Realistic reel-reel tape recorder and Realistic tape stock.

Songlist: Blues yodel no. 8 — Come see Jerusalem — San Francisco Bay blues — I’m a gambler — Talkin’ merchant marine — Talkin’ Hugh Brown — Talkin’ lobbyist — Red rosey bush — Johnny I hardly knew you — Jesus Christ — Streets of glory — K.C. Moan

For details, view the tape in our online collections database.

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Diary entry by Matthew Marvin – January 25, 1863

Friday, January 25th, 2013

Diary entry by Matthew Marvin of the 1st Minnesota Regiment, written from the 1st Minnesota’s camp at Stafford Hills near Falmouth, Virginia. This week Marvin writes of General Burnside’s address to the troops: “Burnside in hs addrs said that our recent successes in Ark & Tenn & Ky had weakened the enemy in wes[tern] front & now was the time for the heros of so many battles to gain a decisive Victory over the enemy[.] The boys would not rais a cheer for him or the address”.

Marvin and the 1st Minnesota have been anticipating a move from their winter camp, but rain intervenes. Marvin writes, “the roads are allmost impassible[.] The bad weather has certanly frustrated the plans & we shall remain here sometim”. Just a day later Marvin records this observation: “About ½ doz of the Sholder straps* disgraced them selves & the Regt by geting gloriosly drunk”.

*Marvin refers to officers, whose rank is denoted by the “shoulder straps” on their uniforms.

On Sunday the 25th Marvin writes:

Come on Picket & relieved the 7th Mich[.] Instructions to allow no citizen to pass but let stragling Soldiers in[.] Their is one division that is stuck in the mud on their way out[.] herd but one bird chirrup & 2 crows crokeing[.] The roads are very bad[.] Their is a rumor that Hooker is under arrest for speaking disrespectfuly of the late movement[.] Sit around the fire till near [AM] Weather pleasant eraly on[,] AM sprinkled[.]

See more of the diary near this date: 1863-01-25_Marvin_combined

Citation: January 20-25, 1863 Diary entries by Matthew Marvin, Diary notes and memos. Matthew Marvin Papers. Minnesota Historical Society. [P2355 box 1]

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Hmong wooden top

Thursday, January 24th, 2013

Hmong wooden top

Wooden top made in June of 1983 by Sying Yang, a Hmong immigrant to St. Paul, when he was 13 years old.

For details, view the top in our online collections database.

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Letter from Charles Goddard of the 1st Minnesota to his mother about current events and life in camp, including a recipe for baked beans with hard tack – January 24, 1863

Thursday, January 24th, 2013

Camp Near Falmouth Va Jan 24th 1863
Dear Mother
We have been expecting to move for some time, but have finly concluded it is all gamon*. We have been having very bad weather, but when we compare it with the weather we had last winter in old Maryland, we can consider our selves lucky fellows. Hiram Brink recd a letter from [X].L. Brink and he says that they will not take the postage currency for postage stamps in Winona, now if this is the case Mr. Blanchard or whoever sells stamps is violating the law and more than that[,] if I know any thing about it[,] he is liable to be fined[.] I think if whoever sells postage stamps wont take postage currency that they are making a good thing off of the people of Winona or in other words is pocketing the specia he receives for his stamps and buyes them with postage currency. So you see it leaves him with his pockets full of specia which he can sell for $1.30 to $.40 for evry dollar of silver or gold he can rais. I think if this is the case up in Winona it is high time that some one would put a stop to it[.] I suppose I cannot send home and get stamps so you and I cannot enter in to a contract as I proposed in my other letter. Charley Ely received a letter from his Mother and Sister, it was dated the 13th of this month. He is highly delighted with his Sister’s writeing, and he thinks she is learning very fast[.] It was the first I knew about his GranMother being in Minnesota[.]
Eldridge Smith of our Co has been discharged on account of his deafness, he is a Brother to Andrew Smith and Dave, but a much better fellow than eather of them. We expect him up here befor long and if he goes to Winona I will try and send the china cup I have for Orren. Mother what do you think of Gov Seymour and Parker of New York and New Jersy[?] I do not think I am going to protect the homes of such black hearted traitors as these are. I can see they are traitors jest as plain as I can see this sheet of paper I am writeing on. If they put such men in for Gov’s I am going home. I don’t feel inclined to fight for such men. I am in for disloging any Officer who dose not give the Presidents proclamation his cordial support and give the President his cordial support to for I think Abriham is a good President[.]
How is Uncle John C getting along in the Country[?] I received a letter from Susan sometime after her marriage with Reuben Black but I could not answer it because I had no postage stamp. she says Uncle and Aunt wer well but that was some time ago. Reuben is in the rangers is he not[?] Mother you never say any thing about George Wilson Thomas Norton and John Norton[.] I some times think they are dead, but when I come to think of it they might be married[.] if John is there he is most likely gallanting some beautiful you damsel over to the Lake to take a skate. I wonder if the mill whistle disturbs [Tomy] as much as it yousto. I am inclined to think it dose for if the mill stops it will result in the bankruptcy of Laird Norton and Co. George Wilson is a lucky fellow for it would have been the last of his [nose] if he had come in the Army[.] there is no end of the pork we have to eat, eat pork and crackers (hard tack) or suck your pan and as I dont always feel inclined I generaly tak crackers and pork. If I ever get home I will show you how to fry crackers and smother beans[,] or more comonly called baked beans[,] I do not know but I guess that a receipt will do as well. Take as many beans as you want for a mess and par boil or partially boil them[,] then tak a spade and dig a hole large anough for the pot you are going to cook the beans in and build a fire in it, and get it as warm as you can, then take the pot of beans and put in a peice of meat in the center of the pot[,] then cover the pot over and put it in the hole covering the pot with the coals that ar in the hole and earth on top of them[,] and in twenty four hours you have a soldiers dish of baked beans. We bake a good many crackers that way, first pore water on them[,] put them in the bean hole and bake them. We heard here to day that Gen Burnside had been superceded by little McClellen. it would of been a very pleasant surprise, to me and Co “K”. Our Chaplain dose not preach much now on account of the weather. he is not much miss for we do not like him[.] his name is Conway[.] I like him as [a] soldier[,] but not as a preacher[.]
Tomorrow morning we go on picket. I expect a bad time. Mother I hav not been writeing because what I write is interesting but beacus I have nothing else to do and that is what makes me dislike Soldiering. some times we have so much to do that we nearly brake down with fatigue and other times we have almost nothing to do.

*Gammon is defined as “misleading or nonsensical talk; humbug” by the Free Dictionary: www.thefreedictionary.com/gammon

See complete letter: 1863-01-24_Smith_combined

Citation: January 24, 1863, Letter from Charles Goddard to his mother, Correspondence 1853-1862. Smith, Orrin Fruit and Family Papers, 1829-1932. Minnesota Historical Society. [P1434 box 1]

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Weather or Not: Winter in Minnesota

Wednesday, January 23rd, 2013

As Minnesotans, we love to talk about the weather. Talk about it, obsess over it, live in it, love it. Or love hating it, at least. Since the Saint Paul Winter Carnival and Crashed Ice start soon, we thought this a good time to look at a variety of winter weather from images and film in our Collection, including an Easter snowball fight, winter swimming, -20 degrees, and blizzards. Enjoy the misery of others and maybe watch it again come July!

icon for podpress  Podcast Video [3:09m]: Download (1460)

Produced by Sondra Reierson

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Hubert Humphrey and raspberries

Wednesday, January 23rd, 2013

Hubert H. Humphrey

Hubert H. Humphrey poses for a publicity photograph after beginning his term of office as the 35th mayor of Minneapolis.  Captured by a Minneapolis newspaper photographer in July of 1945.

For details, view the photograph in our online collections database.

Learn more:

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“Lt. Col. Andrews to His Old Company, 3d Regiment,” and “Fourth Report of T.R. Cressy, Chaplain Second Regiment Minnesota Volunteer Infantry,” St. Paul Pioneer and Democrat – January 23, 1863

Wednesday, January 23rd, 2013

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Side saddle

Tuesday, January 22nd, 2013

Side saddleSide saddle stirrup

Woman’s leather side saddle with a floral pattern plush fabric seat. The saddle has a single slipper stirrup for the left foot with a heart shape cut out of the tread, an upright pommel for hooking the right leg, a horn to secure the right knee, and a cloth girth.  Julia R. Ingraham Blake used the saddle. Julia married John Blake in 1858 and in 1861 brought the saddle with her when the couple moved from Massachusetts to Rochester, Minnesota. John Blake established a general merchandise store in Rochester and the couple lived there until 1882, when they moved to Minneapolis.

For details, view the saddle in our online collections database.

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“News of the Morning,” “An Anomalous Winter–Antipodal Extremes,” and Latest News,” St. Paul Daily Press – January 22, 1863

Tuesday, January 22nd, 2013

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An Ounce of Preservation: A Guide to the Care of Papers and Photographs