Home / Collections / Podcast & Blog » 2012 » December

Collections

Collections Up Close

Archive for December, 2012

“Arrival of Fugitive Slaves,” and “Latest News,” St. Paul Press – December 25, 1862

Tuesday, December 25th, 2012

Bookmark and Share

Victorian pop-up Christmas card

Monday, December 24th, 2012

Victorian pop-up Christmas card

Three-dimensional Christmas card depicting a rigged sailing ship (the name on its hull reads, “FORTUNA”).  Two flaps (one resembling a dock) fold outward to form a base for the fully-extended ship and its three-dimensional deck and hull.  The words, “A Merry Christmas!” are printed on the dock flap.   Printed circa 1880.

For details, view the card in our online collections database.

Learn more:

Bookmark and Share

Letter to Governor Alexander Ramsey from B. A. Froiseth regarding a bill – December 24, 1862

Monday, December 24th, 2012

Washington D.C.
Dec 24, 1862.
His Excellency, the governor
Alex. Ramsey of the state of Minnesota
Dear Sir!
I am informed, that the War Department has transmitted to you a copie of Charles Cotters Bill against the U.S. $150.00 which were transferred to me in full for value received, for your signature of its correctness.
Allow me to bring to your recollection, that when I showed to you said Bill at St. Paul and asked your opinion in regard to the Bill and its payment, you than stated to me, that the Bill was correct, that Congress had provided for the payment of all claims a gainst the 1st Minn: Regt and that I should forward the Duplicate of said Bill to the Quartermaster General at Washington, who would upon receipt thereof order its payment. The Duplicate was sent forward but no order for its pay returned. The Legislature ordered $100. In scrip to be paid and I was compelled to receipt therefore or be still further delayed. The Bill was thus left with the Auditor of the State. Yes there was a legitimate balance yet unpaid of $50.00 which the War Department has resolved to pay me, upon your receipt of the correctness of said Bill, although Col. Sandborns signature to the Bill is, that the amount is correct and has not been paid.
I presume that prudence has justified the War Department in using this unusual precautions and I therefore request from you, at your earliest convenience, your statement of its correctness sent me, in order to avoid me from being swindled or longer delayed of a payment just due to me.
I am very respectfully
B. A. Froiseth

Citation:  December 24, 1862, Letter from B. A. Froiseth, Letters Received–State Purchases. Minnesota: Governor: Ramsey. Records. Minnesota Historical Society. State Archives. Minnesota Historical Society. [111.E.20.4F]

Bookmark and Share

Diary entry by Matthew Marvin – December 23, 1862

Sunday, December 23rd, 2012

Diary entry by Matthew Marvin, Corporal in the 1st Minnesota Regiment, written from the 1st Minnesota’s camp at Stafford Hills near Falmouth, Virginia. This week Marvin continues building houses for the regiment’s winter quarters, gets sugar and dried apples at the commissary, and issues clothing and ordnance to the men in his care. Marvin also notes hearing General Alfred Sully’s farewell address on the 20th and the changes in the command chain that Charlie Goddard wrote home about.  On Tuesday the 23rd he writes:

The Regt went on pick[ett.] I stayed in camp to help mak clothing and Muster Rolls[.] Worked hard as hell all day[.] 11 oclock at night[.] Weather pleasant[.]


Citation:  December 18-23, 1862 Diary entries by Matthew Marvin, Diary notes and memos. Matthew Marvin Papers. Minnesota Historical Society. [P2355 box 1]

Bookmark and Share

Letter from Charles Goddard of the 1st Minnesota to his mother about measles, General Burnsides’s leadership, and life at camp and in Winona – December 22, 1862

Saturday, December 22nd, 2012

Camp near Falmouth Va December 22d 1862
Dear Mother I received your kind letter dated the 8th and 9th of this month. I was very much surprised to hear that Brother Orren was sick. I can simpathize with him for I know what the measels are for I have had them since I have been in the service and I want to ask you if I ever had them when I was young. I have heard that after a person has had them once they will never have them again. if I ever had them when I was young, I certainly have had them twice in my life. We are still incamped on our old grounds and have put up a quite comfertable wood houses with our shelter tents for a roof, and we have very good fire places made of stone, so that we can warm out apartments. I would like to know what you think of General Burnside by this time[.] for my part I do not think he is half the man that McClellen is[.] I do not blame him entirely for this blunder over the river here[,] for the War department ordered him to cross and attack the enemy, but he might of had some better plan laid for the capture of the Rebbles intrenchments than to undertake to storm them[.] if he can not form any better plans he is not the man for that place. Ely is satisfied that he has aneugh to tell his children if they would only let him go home[,] but I dont wish you to understand by this that he wants to quit before peace is declared for he is bound to see the thing through. he is well and gets along fine.
I am very glad to hear of the return of Sam Stebbins to Winona safe and sound for I do not think he can stand this kind of life. I am very much surprised to hear of the increas of his family. I suppose Sam will be rejoiced[.] well I wish him a happy life with his presant wife for he is a good fellow.
Tell Brother Orren that before a great while I will be home and I will learn him how to skate. but Mother you had better be very careful whare he goes a skating if you give him skates for there is a great many bad places in the river and lake[.] Skating will be very good exercise for him but it is coupled with danger. if I was thare I would like nothing better than to learn him how to skate. If you have the pleasure of meeting [Lady] Black give her my best respects. I yousto hear her say she detested a man that chewd tobacco but it seems she has forgotten all about that[.] I wish her and him happyness, I am very sory to hear that those soldiers up there are treated so bad or rather fare so bad, for I would like to see them treated well for protecting the state from the Indians. I am surprised to hear that so many of the friends are sick[,] but I hope none of them very bad. I believe Mother I would try and crawll through a pain of glass if I could get at one of your Christmas diners[.] I would not be so ancious to skate all day but would see if I could not get some grub. Charley North is well[,] also Hiram Brink and all of the boys that come from Winona. I haven’t got a very good opinion of the 3rd Regt[.] I think they had ought of been arrested for taking things that did not of course belong to them[.] they had ought to og been ashamed of themselves[.]
Mother I want to know if you think I could be appointed at your kind letters if you do you are very much mistaken[.] I will promis to write as often as I can. It is not always that a soldier can sit down soon after recovering a letter and answer it. He is often detailed at the Quarter Masters department or on extra duty or the Regt may be starting on pickett and he will be obliged to shoulder his pack and [tsable]. I do not mean to say that I cannot write but that I have to wait until I am not engaged. I have been down to Falmouth to day and I think less of the place than I ever did before[.] I wish we could spend our Christmas in Fredricksburg for there we would have a gay time, eat our Christmas dinner on marble top tables and in fine parlors and we would have a jar of preserves for a change and see how it would go. Brigadier General Alfred Sully that comanded this Brigade has command of Frenches Division and Conl Moorhead of Burnes Brigade has taken comand of us[.] After we had come back from across the river General Howard complimented us for standing so firm over the river at the Battle of Fredericksburg[.]
My best respects to all of my friends
CE Goddard 1st Regt



Citation: December 22, 1862 Letter from Charles Goddard to his mother, Correspondence 1853-1862. Smith, Orrin Fruit and Family Papers, 1829-1932. Minnesota Historical Society. [P1434 box 1]

Bookmark and Share

Tanks on Nicollet Avenue

Friday, December 21st, 2012

Tanks on Nicollet Avenue

A line of tanks rolls down Nicollet Avenue in downtown Minneapolis as part of a parade. Captured on October 13, 1943 by a Minneapolis newspaper photographer.

For details, view the photograph in our online collections database.

Bookmark and Share

“Return of Hartsville Prisoners–Mean Trick of Bragg’s–Our Soldiers Robberd by Rebels,” “Latest News,” and “The Army of the Potomac,” St. Paul Press – December 21, 1862

Friday, December 21st, 2012

Bookmark and Share

Civil War-era ear picks and spoon

Thursday, December 20th, 2012

Civil War-era ear picks and spoon

Ear picks and spoon carved out of bone and used during the Civil War by Brigadier General Lewis Addison Grant of the 5th Vermont Brigade, 6th Army Corps Division.  A pin driven through the bases of the two picks and spoon allows the three tools to swivel independently.

For details, view the picks and spoon in our online collections database.

Learn more:

Bookmark and Share

“Great Battle: At Fredericksburg,” “Battle of Prairie Grove,” and “Promotions in the Third Regiment,” Chaska Valley Herald – December 20, 1862

Thursday, December 20th, 2012

Bookmark and Share

Marriage Amendment shirt

Wednesday, December 19th, 2012

Marriage Amendment shirt

Silk screened cotton t-shirt manufactured for Minnesotans United for All Families, a coalition that opposed passage of a constitutional amendment that would have defined marriage in the state of Minnesota as the union between a man and a woman.   The amendment was defeated by 52.56% of voters in the election held on November 6, 2012.

Bookmark and Share


An Ounce of Preservation: A Guide to the Care of Papers and Photographs