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Archive for September, 2012

List of killed and wounded: First MN and Letter from Quartermaster – September 25, 1862

Tuesday, September 25th, 2012

Letter from Francis E. Collins, Quartermaster Sergeant of the 4th Minnesota Regiment, in Corinth, Mississippi, to Ignatius Donnelly.

“Corinth Miss Sept 25th 1862
My Dr Friend    […]    I received a letter from my wife which I will enclose to you.  Just think how she must feel, to be insulted by some low bred hound. Oh, I wish I had been there. he nor no other man would have done so, – I know I have my faults, but I have always tried as far as possable to pay my way, and have done so until the last two or three years, when I became so involved not so much on my own account as for my friends that I could not do as I should wish. I know I never had the blues so bad in my life. I should like to give you a full account of our late battle, but I have not time nor the spirits to do so.  Chaplin Fisk of our Regiment has just returned from Iuke [the Battle of Iuka (Mississippi) was fought September 19, 1862], he tells me there are fully 300 of the Enemy in the Public Hospital and any amount of them in private Houses round the Country[.] he also tells me our folks paroled over 550 prisoners yesterday[.] he thinks there must be 300 more yet on hand. Col. Sanborn cover’d himself with Glory[;] everyone Speaks in the highest terms of him for his Coolness and bravery under one of the Severest fire’s known in this war. […]
believe me to be your Sincere Friend F. E. Collins”


Citation:  September 25, 1862 Letter from F.E. Collins to Ignatius Donnelly, Correspondence and Miscellaneous Papers September-October 15, 1862. Ignatius Donnelly and family papers, 1812-1973. Minnesota Historical Society. [146.C.19.5B]

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Spool drum

Monday, September 24th, 2012

Spool drum

Inventor’s model spool drum made by Sam Badger of the 4th Minnesota Infantry Regiment, Company H during the Civil War.

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“News of the Morning”, “Loss in Sumner’s Corps” (at Antietam), “The Force surrendered at Harper’s Ferry,” and “The Foe at Home,” Saint Paul Press – September 24, 1862

Monday, September 24th, 2012

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“Army Correspondence” from Tennessee and Washington DC, Stillwater Messenger – September 23, 1862

Sunday, September 23rd, 2012

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Letter from Frederick Driscoll, Secretary of the Minnesota Senate, regarding his arrival at Fort Ridgley – September 22, 1862

Saturday, September 22nd, 2012

“Fort Ridgley, Tuesday morning
Sept. 22-1862
Dr Gov. I arrived here with our party[,] consisting of Col Crooks, Col. Cullen, Maj Galbraith and myself last night and find we will be obliged to wait until tomorrow for an escort of cavalry to Sibley’s camp. This will necessarily detain me until after the Senate adjourns. I trust to meet with success to compensate for the loss of my position for the balance of the session. Perhaps I ought to have resigned when I left but I think my object in leaving would be thereby made public.
Dailey can(of course) sign all certificates &c as Act’g Sec’y. hoping to find you in the city when I return which will be probably next Monday[.] I remain
Very Truly Yours F. Driscoll
Excuse pen and paper”


Who’s who in this letter:
• Frederick Driscoll: Representative from Sand Creek in the Minnesota Legislature, 1861 session; editor of the “Scott County Journal”; elected Secretary of the Senate, 1862 session
• William Crooks: commanded the 6th Minnesota Regiment at the battles of Birch Coulee (9/2/1862) and Wood Lake (9/23/1862). Crooks would later serve as a representative in the Minnesota State Legislature
• William J. Cullen: served as the Superintendent of Indian Affairs for the northern district, including Minnesota, during the Buchanan Administration (1857-1861)
• Thomas J. Galbraith: Sioux Indian Agent when the U.S.-Dakota War erupted in August, 1862
• “Dailey”: possibly Mervin A. Dailey, a lawyer from Owatonna who would be elected to the Minnesota State Senate in November 1862

Learn more about the US Dakota War of 1862, as well as its causes and consequences, by visiting this website or by viewing the exhibit at the Minnesota History Center.

Citation: September 22, 1862 Letter from F. Driscoll to Ignatius Donnelly, Correspondence September-October 15, 1862. Ignatius Donnelly and family papers, 1812-1973. Minnesota Historical Society. [146.C.19.5B]

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Lace shawl

Friday, September 21st, 2012

Lace shawl

Triangular, machine-run black lace shawl with hand-run outlines made by Mrs. Gernet C. Dodge circa 1865.

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Letter from Francis E. Collins to Ignatius Donnelly – September 21, 1862

Friday, September 21st, 2012

Excerpt from the first two pages of a letter from Francis E Collins, Quartermaster Sergeant of the 4th Minnesota Regiment, in Corinth, Mississippi.

“Corinth Sept 21st 1862
My Dr Friend I received your kind letter of the 7th this day – week and this is the first opportunity I have had to answer it[,] I have been kept so engaged ever since. On Monday we were order’d to strike our tents, pack up bag and baggage and all stores that we could not find transportation for, were to be burned[.] we remained thus untill Thursday afternoon, when Gen’l Hamlinton sent all his transportation back to Corinth in charge of Maj Baxter and myself, so here we are.
I do not like it a bit[.] I did hope if there was to be a fight, I would have a hand in it. But they say the first duty of a soldier is to obay orders. There is a report in town to night that Hamlinton’s Division was attacked to day by a portion of Prices’s army, and that the 4th Min suffered severely[.] another report says that Genl Stanley’s Division were also attacked and that the 11th Ohio Battery and Fifth Minnesota were cut all to pieces. how true it is I have no means of knowing. […]“

See whole letter: 1862-09-21_Donnelly_combined

Citation:  September 21, 1862 Letter from F E Collins to Ignatius Donnelly, Correspondence September-October 15, 1862. Ignatius Donnelly and family papers, 1812-1973. Minnesota Historical Society. [146.C.19.5B]

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Horse buying defense bonds

Thursday, September 20th, 2012

Horse buying defense bonds

In what was probably a staged photograph opportunity designed to build support for a bond drive, a horse approaches two post office workers at a service window as if to purchase defense bonds.  Captured by a Minneapolis newspaper photographer on April 3, 1942.

For details, view the photograph in our online collections database.

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“The Sioux War,” including letters from Little Crow, Wabashaw and Taopee, Mankato Semi-Weekly Record – September 20, 1862

Thursday, September 20th, 2012

  • Learn more about the US Dakota War of 1862, as well as its causes and consequences, by visiting this website or by viewing the exhibit at the Minnesota History Center.

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Physician’s scale

Wednesday, September 19th, 2012

Physician's scale

Collapsible physician’s  scale in a wooden case.  The scale was collected from a medical school in Mobile, Alabama after the Battle of Mobile Bay (a major naval engagement of the Civil War) in August of 1864.  The rectangular case has brass clasps and pin latches on its front.  Oval and rectangular brass plates are screwed into place on its top, and two brass hinges attach to its back.  The case holds a variety of brass weighing instruments, including balances, scales, weights, and bowls.

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An Ounce of Preservation: A Guide to the Care of Papers and Photographs



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