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Kettle made in 1635

Monday, April 30th, 2012

Copper kettle made in 1635

Copper kettle made in England in 1635.  The kettle has a rounded cauldron with a curved spout and hand-riveted plates attaching a brass handle. A removable round top contains a pull handle.  Used in England and in Winona, Minnesota by the Marvin family.

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US Army officer’s Model 1858 uniform hat – April 30, 1862

Monday, April 30th, 2012

This “Hardee” hat, a United States Army Model 1858 dress hat, belonged to Gold Tompkins Curtis of the 5th Minnesota Regiment, Company K. Curtis was mustered in as Captain of his company on April 30, 1862 and held that post until his death from dysentery in St. Louis, Missouri on July 24, 1862. The black felt hat has a silk hatband and a plume of two black ostrich feathers with a brass button.

See other Civil War items in Collections Online: http://greatriversnetwork.org/index.php?brand=cms&q=%22Civil%20War%22&startindex=1&count=25&displaymode=grid

Citation: US Army officer’s Model 1858 uniform hat. 6844.2. Minnesota Historical Society.

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“Army Correspondence: From the Minnesota First,” Stillwater Messenger – April 29, 1862

Sunday, April 29th, 2012

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“America as Seen by a Candid Englishman,” and “The News,” Mankato Independent – April 28, 1862

Saturday, April 28th, 2012

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Documents related to Edward C. Sickels

Friday, April 27th, 2012

Documents related to Edward C. Sickels

Documents related to Reverend Edward C. Sickels, pastor emeritus of a Presbyterian church in Dixon, Illinois.  The documents comprise a newspaper clipping (A), municipal pass (B), and passport (C).  The newspaper clipping describes Sickels’ retirement; a photograph portrait is included. Handwritten on the bottom margin are the words, “The Interior 1/18/1903.”  The municipal pass (#79347) was issued to Sickels on December 14, 1861, by Provost Marshall George E. Leighton, Provost Marshall George E. Leighton of the 19th Missouri Regiment.  The pass entitles Sickels to pass beyond the city limits and county of St. Louis to enter to Illinois.  On the reverse of the pass is a physical description of Sickels. The cover of the blue cloth-bound passport booklet is embossed with the words “E. C. Sickels;” the booklet contains two paper leaves listing handwritten addresses throughout Europe to which Sickels traveled in 1857.  The main foldout passport sheet, with visas and approvals, has been removed, unfolded and stored separately.

For details, view the clipping, pass and passport in our online collections database.

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“Local Affairs,” and “The First Minnesota Battery at Pittsburg,” St. Paul Press – April 27, 1862

Friday, April 27th, 2012

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Doorbell from the Commodore Hotel

Thursday, April 26th, 2012

Doorbell from the Commodore Hotel

Doorbell from the Commodore Hotel in St. Paul, Minnesota, a favorite haunt of F. Scott Fitzgerald.  The bell operates by means of a key connected to a clockwork mechanism. As the key is turned, the clapper is struck against the bell. Two holes in the base permitted the bell to be mounted to a hotel room door.  The bell was recovered from the hotel building before its remodeling in 1978.

To hear the bell, watch the Hearing History: Sounds of the Collection podcast.

For details, view the bell in our online collections database.

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Letter reporting troops “spoiling for a fight” – April 26, 1862

Thursday, April 26th, 2012

Transcription of an excerpt from page 1 of a letter from Henry Lindergreen to Ignatius Donnelly regarding the 1st Minnesota Regiment’s situation near Yorktown, Virginia.

“Camp Winfield Scott, near Yorktown, Virginia, April 26, 1862.
Dear Friends Donnelly and Lady, Here we are, that is the First Minnesota Regiment and Lindergreen[.] it seems as if they could not get along without me for here I am still, in a tent made of rubber blankets[,] pine boughs, bark from trees logs and such like[.] it is raining now but we are dry[.] have just eaten my dinner which consisted of coffee, hard bread, salt beef, or salt horse as we call it[.] it goes by a great many names the [Daphuneal] Zouaves who lived on it 41 days, call it salt mule’s tail, the Rebels call it blue beef, it is nearly as good as so many chips[.]  I will give you our position, although I might be court martialed if McClelland should find it out.  We are on the right flank, of the left wing of the Grand Army, which brings us a little to the left of the centre and about 4 miles from Yorktown[.] we are in Sumner’s Corps, Sedgwick’s Division and Gorman’s Brigade; Fifteenth Massachusetts, New York Thirty Fourth, New York Second State Militia and the Minnesota First, Dana’s Brigade, Michigan Seventh, 42 New York, 17th and 20th Massachusetts, Burn’s Brigade; 1st California Regiment, 67th Pennsylvania or Daddy Owen’s Regular’s as they call themselves, Baxter’s Philadelphia Fire Zouaves, and one other Regiment I do not know the name of[.] this comprises our division[.] We are encamped in an open field with pine woods on all sides of us, and if you could only be here to walk through said woods you would be somewhat astonished[.] every ten steps brings you upon a battery of from 6 to 8 cannon, and you cannot see them until you are upon them[.] Gen. McClelland is right here with us and his headquarters are on Camp Winfield Scott[.] no doubt, in a few days will be fought one of the greatest battles that has ever come off in America[.] we shall have no surprise here, like that at Pittsburg Landing[.] our troops are wide awake and spoiling for a fight[.] every night at midnight, the regiments have to all get up, put on their equipment and then go back to bed with them on[.] just before daylight we have to get up again and all answer to our names[.] several nights we have been up in line of battle, caused by volleys of musketry from the Rebels[.] here a week ago yesterday, Smith’s Division had quite a smart little skirmish, and some of the Vermont men got pretty badly cut up, but they gave the Rebels as good as they sent[.] We are now engaged doing picket duty, fatigue work, such as building [breastworks], digging rifle pits, making towers for signaling and all such work.  We have got a strong place to deal with, but with as good an army as we have got and with Mc., at the head of us we are confident of success[.] no more Bull Run’s is our motto now, but time will tell[.] I have no idea when the attack will begin but it must be before a great while […]“

See full text:

Citation:  April 26, 1862 Letter from Henry Lindergreen to Lieutenant Governor Ignatius Donnelly, Correspondence Apr-May. 1862. Ignatius Donnelly and family papers, 1812-1973. Minnesota Historical Society.

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Ojibwe beaded moccasins

Wednesday, April 25th, 2012

Ojibwe beaded moccasins

Pair of leather moccasins made in the late nineteenth century.  The black velvet cuff and vamp are decorated with metal faceted and glass seed beads arranged in a floral motif. Predominant colors are clear, white, purples, yellows, oranges, blues, greens, and reds. The cuff and tongue are trimmed with a purple silk ribbon that serves as a tie closure.

For details, view the moccasins in our online collections database.

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Letter from 4th reg. Col. Sanborn reporting his arrivial in St. Louis – April 25, 1862

Wednesday, April 25th, 2012

Transcription of a letter from Colonel John B. Sanborn of the 4th Minnesota Regiment to Governor Ramsey reporting the Regiment’s arrival in St. Louis.

“Head Quarters 4th [Reg. Minn. Vols.] Benton Barracks Mo.
April 25th 1862
Alex. Ramsey, Governor etc. Minnesota
Sir I have the honor to report that I have moved all the troops specified in general order No.s one and two from the Adjutant General’s office as directed in those orders, and have reported my command at Saint Louis – as therein directed. I arrived on the night of the 24th.  The health of the regiment is good, No accident occurred coming down
We are another of the [best] Regiments that has been in the service.  We are praised and flattered by every tongue, military men included.  The men I find do not object to this.
We are making every effort to get rifle muskets and all our transportation so that we can move at once. I think we will be prepared to move by tomorrow or next day.
One of Keelton’s[*] Aid[e]s-de-Camp told me he thought we would not stay here long.  I should be glad to hear from you soon.
[Your] Obt Servt
John B. Sanborn Col. Comd 4th Regt. Minn Vols
*Probably Captain J. C. Kelton”


Citation:  April 25, 1862 Letter from Colonel Sanborn, Letters Received–4th Regiment. Minnesota: Governor: Ramsey. Records. Minnesota Historical Society. State Archives. Minnesota Historical Society.

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An Ounce of Preservation: A Guide to the Care of Papers and Photographs