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Entry from Matthew Marvin’s Diary – February 24, 1862

Friday, February 24th, 2012

Transcription of a diary entry by Matthew Marvin, Private in the 1st Minnesota Regiment, from Camp Stone in Virginia.

“No drill[.] wrote to Jim and John[.] Rec’d orders to march at 8 AM[.] Weather cold[,] very hard wind[,] froze hard as a rock[.]“

Citation:  February 24, 1862 Diary entry by Matthew Marvin, Diary notes and memos. Matthew Marvin Papers. Minnesota Historical Society.

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Ramones fan club postcard

Thursday, February 23rd, 2012

Ramones fan club postcard (recto)

Rectangular paper postcard with a  reproduction of a black and white photograph of New York City-based punk band The Ramones on the recto.  On the verso is printed the following:

Dear Ramones Fan,

Here’s the scoop…there’s a new fan club and the only way we can insure its success is if YOU join! All it takes is $3.50 for a years [sic] membership (to cover printing and postage costs). In return you’ll receive an official membership card, buttons, pictures and a newsletter that’ll tell you everything you need to know…maybe more. We’ll also give you a line on exclusive Ramones goodies. Please include all questions for the boys and all your suggestions for the club. We want to know what you want. Also, if you have personal letters for the band, we’ll pass them along…So–

Gabba Gabba Hey!
Michael Trese
President
Ramones Fan Club

The postcard was postmarked February 1, 1978 in Burbank, California.

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Letter from Ignatius Donnelly’s sister Nellie re: celebrations in Philadelphia – February 23, 1862

Thursday, February 23rd, 2012

“Philadelphia Feby 23rd/62
My Dear Ig,
Your last kind favor gave me a great deal of pleasure; had not my time been so very much occupied I would have replied sooner.  We are living here a most jovial kind of life in the flush and excitement of our land and naval victories. Yesterday, (“Washington’s Birthday”) was a perfect carnival.  Military display, flag waving martial music and illuminations completely “sank” for the nonce the slow-coach quiet of the descendants of Penn.  Phillie and I were out with some friends the greater part of the day driving through the principal streets and witnessing the parade from an open carriage; it was a gala sight you may well believe, – victory and pleasure beaming from every countenance.  What think you now of the fate of Secession?
We are much indebted for the paper containing the notice of the inauguration; also for the fine ethnical record from yr pen.  Always send us such things – it affords us much pleasure to read them.  I look forward to your fall visit with delight; but in the mean time do not fail to send me yr carte-de-visite for my Photographs Album as soon as possible. […]“


See full text: 1862-02-23_full_text

Citation:  February 23, 1862 Letter from Eleanor C. Donnelly (Nellie) to Lieutenant Governor Ignatius Donnelly, Correspondence Jan-Mar. 1862. Ignatius Donnelly and family papers, 1812-1973. Minnesota Historical Society.

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Dumpy level

Wednesday, February 22nd, 2012

Dumpy level

Dumpy level (a leveling instrument used by builders and surveyors) manufactured by Eugene Dietzgen & Company of Chicago, Illinois in 1950. Used by the Minnesota Highway Department (now Minnesota Department of Transportation) at its Mankato office.

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Letter from Goddard to mother relying excitement of men upon hearing new of victories – February 22, 1862

Wednesday, February 22nd, 2012

Letter from Private Charles Goddard of the 1st Minnesota Regiment to his mother, Catherine Smith, from Camp Minnesota. Goddard claimed to be eighteen years old upon volunteering to serve with the 1st Minnesota Volunteer Infantry Regiment. In fact, he was fifteen years old. He talks about the men being excited to hear about of victory at Ft. Donelson & New Orleans; doesn’t want mom going back to Winona (from Penn.) alone since they have no home to go back to.

“Camp Minnesota Feb 22nd 1862 No longer Camp Stone
Dear Mother[,] Our camp is all in excitement over the great victory at Fort Donelson also the report of the capture of General Price and staff and the taking of New Orleans. These reports can not be relyed on but we know that the Union arms have won at Donelson[.] Your letter of the 19th arrived duly at hand last evening[.] you still seem to be home sick besids having the sick headeach[.] if you think you could get along better in Winona than in Pa I do not know but you had better go but Mother you know we have no home and will be pretty hard for you to go back all alone and commence house keeping[.] I would like to know what you did with our cow and your cooking rig. You might of wrote to me about these before but if yo did I have forgotten[.] What do you think of doing when you get back[?] keep boarders as you yous to or not. When I am discharged (if I am ever) I will have one hundred dollars besides my last payment which will help us along considerable but will not begin to build us a house[.] never mind Mother we will get along some how. all I ask for you is to keep good spirates. I think the war cannot last much longer for of late we have won every battle and I know the Rebbls cannot stand long without gaining some battles. I have to stop for to clean up my braces* to go out and see the sword[,] saddle[,] bridle and pistol presented to Conel Dana (now General Dana)[…]

*Braces: chiefly British, meaning suspenders

See full text: 1862-02-22_full_text

Citation: Correspondence 1853-1862. Smith, Orrin Fruit and Family Papers, 1829-1932. Minnesota Historical Society.

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Church hat

Tuesday, February 21st, 2012

Church hat

Straw cloche hat trimmed with fabric roses purchased at Newman’s in St. Paul circa 1956. Donor Merrie Barr wore the hat while attending St. Paul’s Pilgrim Baptist Church throughout the mid-to-late 1950s.

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Invitation for ‘Governor’ Donelly to read G. Washington’s Farewell address – February 21, 1862

Tuesday, February 21st, 2012

Letter from Colonel John B. Sanborn* of the 4th Minnesota Regiment inviting Ignatius Donnelly to read George Washington’s farewell address to the soldiers at Fort Snelling in a George Washington birthday celebration.

“Hd Qrs 4th Regt. Minn. Vols. F Snelling Feby 21st 1862
Governor Donnelly St Paul MInn
Dear Sir We desire to have a few exercises to morrow in commemoration of the birth day of the Father of His Country and among the exercises the reading of his farewell address.
And I take pleasure in inviting you to read this address to the Officers and Soldiers now in this garrison – about eleven hundred – and to make any remarks you deem appropriate to the occasion, and adapted to the day, at twelve NC.
Please inform us by the bearer if you can attend.
With Great Respect Your Obt Servt John B. Sanborn
Col Comdg 4th Regt. Minn Vols”

* John B. Sanborn served Minnesota as a State Representative, State Senator, and as Adjutant General before he became colonel of the 4th Regiment.

Citation: February 21, 1862 Letter from Colonel John B. Sanborn to Lieutenant Governor Ignatius Donnelly, Correspondence Jan-Mar. 1862. Ignatius Donnelly and family papers, 1812-1973. Minnesota Historical Society.

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Another letter from D.L. Simpson, the father of a man who died while serving in Minnesota’s 2nd regiment – February 20, 1862

Monday, February 20th, 2012

Transcription of page 1 of another letter from D.L. Simpson, father of 1st Lieutenant Henry C. Simpson of the 2nd Minnesota Infantry Regiment, to Governor Alexander Ramsey regarding his son’s remains. He  requests that the son’s remains be sent to the father’s home in New Hampshire at the expense of the government. See the December 11, 1861 entry for the first letter from Simpson.

“West Rumney, N.H. Feb 20, 1862 His Excellency
Gov Ramsey – Dear Sir, I wrote you some two months since with regard to the removal of the remains of my son, Lieut H C Simpson of Comp C 2 Regt Minn Volunteers, asking assistance in their removal. I received a very satisfactory answer. You said you would call the attention of your Legislature, which was then about to assemble, to the subject, which you did. I have watched the reported proceedings of the legislature from week to week but have noticed no action upon the subject. Since I wrote you before, his wife has deceased and is buries in the cemetery near this place. They have left to my care their two orphan children with nothing of any amount to assist me in their maintenance and education. My own means are very limited or I would not trouble you with this letter. I know that the public exigencies call heavily upon the resources of States as well as individuals, but you may well think that it would be a great consolation to me and his other friends here, could his body be removed and deposited in our cemetery by the side of his wife and other friends who have preceded him to the spirit world. […]“


See full text: 1862-02-20_full_text

Citation: February 20, 1862 Letter from… . Letters Received–Requests for Assistance. Minnesota: Governor: Ramsey. Records. Minnesota Historical Society. State Archives. Minnesota Historical Society.

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“The News This Morning,” “Local Affairs,” and “Latest News,” St. Paul Press – February 19, 1862

Sunday, February 19th, 2012

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“The Greatest of Victories,” and “Local Affairs,” St. Paul Press – February 18, 1862

Saturday, February 18th, 2012

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An Ounce of Preservation: A Guide to the Care of Papers and Photographs