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First Minnesota veteran’s button

Friday, January 13th, 2012

First Minnesota veteran's button

Commemorative pin-back button with an outline of a three leaf clover and the words, “First Minnesota Vols. April 29th, 1861.” On April 29, 1861, the First Minnesota Volunteer Infantry Regiment was formally mustered in at Fort Snelling. The corps insignia badge worn by members of the First during the Civil War was a three leaf clover marked “FIRST / MINN / VOLS.”

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Entry from Matthew Marvin’s diary – January 13, 1862

Friday, January 13th, 2012

“Monday 13th I scalded my foot last night while washing and blistered the top of my foot [.] put on sweet oil and took out the soreness[.] Off duty[.] Weather hazy and mud from one to six feet deep[.]“


Citation: January 13, 1862 Diary entry by Matthew Marvin, Diary notes and memos. Matthew Marvin Papers. Minnesota Historical Society.

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Co-op bulk foods bin

Thursday, January 12th, 2012

North Country Co-op bulk food bin

Clear plastic bulk foods bin with sliding lid and gray plastic scoop used at the North Country Co-op grocery store in Minneapolis.  The worker-owned co-op, one of the first in the Twin Cities area to sell organic and natural foods, operated for more than 35 years before closing in 2007.

For more details, view the bin in our online collections catalog.

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“Local Affairs,” and “Little Eddie, the Drummer,” St. Paul Press – January 12, 1862

Thursday, January 12th, 2012

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Ceramic plate

Wednesday, January 11th, 2012

Ceramic plate

Ceramic plate made by St. Paul artist Kirk Lyttle, 2008.

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“Mrs. Lincoln’s Bonnet,” “The Minnesota Artillery,” “Our Washington Correspondence,” and “Suffering in the Rebel Dominion,” The Rochester City Post – January 11, 1862

Wednesday, January 11th, 2012

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Girl Scout uniform

Tuesday, January 10th, 2012

1920s Girl Scout uniform

Girl Scout uniform and accessories, 1920s.  The uniform’s owner became a Girl Scout in 1920 at the age of 12 in St. Paul, Minnesota; by the age of 17 she had earned 25 merit badges, displayed here on the sleeves of the dress.  Her troop met at the People’s Church near the present site of United Hospitals, St. Paul.

The uniform consists of one button-down cotton dress with five large girl scout insignia buttons, proficiency badges, and rank and troop patches on the left sleeve and breast pocket.  In addition, there are six pins on the breast pocket for Community Service Junior and Senior Lifesaving,  and two six-pointed gold attendance stars.  In addition to the dress there are a cotton sash-belt with a brass insignia button; one triangular tie; one brass trefoil pin and one metal whistle attached to a black ribbon.

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Letter regarding the 2nd MN’s movements and impending meeting with Confederate forces – January 10, 1862

Tuesday, January 10th, 2012

Letter from A. Wilkin (2nd Minn) to father from Columbia.  He is expecting a battle against a superior force, mentions bad roads (wishes for a freeze), and no letters for him have arrived.

“Columbia[,] Jany 10th 1862 Dear Father,  This will probably be the last opportunity I will have to write home for some time.  Tomorrow our Division moves toward Zollicoffer’s entrenchments [Confederate General Felix Zollicoffer’s forces, fortified at Mill Springs, KY].  Our brigade brings up the rear and will constitute the Reserve.  We shall probably have mean work within five days and I am somewhat fearful for the result.  I do not see why Buckner [Simon B. Buckner, division commander in the Army of Central Kentucky] cannot throw in reinforcements and have them back to Bowling Green before they will be needed.  Zollicoffer has already about 14,000 men while our force will not certainly exceed that number.  I wish he would come out and give us a fair chance but the people expect us to do something whatever the chances against us.  The roads are in a dreadful state and it rains almost constantly.  The winter here is the rainy season.  If it would only turn cold and freeze we should be much better pleased.  At the house where I am stopping are a number of refugees from [___]. Several ladies arrived yesterday, having ridden on horseback through the mud 80 miles in three days.  Our Regiment has received 1800 letters within the last three days, but not one for me among the number. I suppose if we whip Zollicoffer we shall then join the main body opposed to Buckner.
Love to Sarah and all our folks Affly [Affectionately] Yours Alex Wilkin”

Citation:  January 10, 1862 Letter from Alexander Wilkin to Father, Correspondence 1862. Alexander Wilkin and Family Papers, 1770-1965. Minnesota Historical Society.

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Key to the city of Odin, Minnesota

Monday, January 9th, 2012

Key to the city of Odin, Minnesota

Key to the City of Odin, Minnesota, presented to Ambassador Bruce Laingen on Febuary 14, 1981. Laingen, a native of Odin, was one of 52 United States citizens held in the Iran hostage crisis of 1979-1981. The key was presented to Laingen shortly after his release on January 20, 1981.

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“The War,” “Our War Correspondence,” and ” Dr. Jackson’s Arrest,” Taylor Falls Reporter – January 9, 1862

Monday, January 9th, 2012

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An Ounce of Preservation: A Guide to the Care of Papers and Photographs