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Colonial Delaware currency

Tuesday, January 31st, 2012

Colonial Delaware currency

Colonial paper currency issued in Delaware on May 1, 1758 in the denomination of 20 shillings.  It reads, in part,

This Indented bill shall pass current for Twenty Shillings within the Government of the Counties of New Castle, Kent, and Sussex, on Delaware, according to an Act of Assembly of the said Government.  Made in the 31st Year of the Reign of our Sovereign Lord King George II.”

The bill is undersigned by William Armstrong, Thomas Clark, and David Hall. Text on the bill’s back reads, “To Counterfeit is Death.”

For more details, view the bill in our online collections database.

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“From Kentucky!”, “Killed and Wounded of the Second Minnesota Regiment,” and “The Policy of General McClellan,” St. Paul Pioneer and Democrat – January 31, 1862

Tuesday, January 31st, 2012

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Strauss ice skates

Monday, January 30th, 2012

Strauss ice skates

Ice skates manufactured by Strauss Skates, Inc. of St. Paul, Minnesota.  The founder of Strauss Skates, John E. Strauss, revolutionized ice skate design in 1914 with his closed-toe boots and lightweight steel blades.   These skates, which date to the 1920s, feature nickel-plated tubular racing blades riveted to the heel and toe of a black leather boot.  The ankle-high, flat-heeled boot has eleven pairs of eyelets and black cotton cord laces.

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Letter from Lindergreen Re: mud problems for the Army of the Potomac (1st MN) – January 30, 1862

Monday, January 30th, 2012

Transcription of an excerpt from pages 1 and 2 of a letter from Private Henry W. Lindergreen of the 1st Minnesota Regiment, Company H, to Ignatius Donnelly regarding events at Camp Stone in Maryland.

“Camp Stone, Maryland, near Edward’s Ferry
January 30th 1862.
Dear Friend Donnelly, I received your welcome letter this morning, and was glad to hear that all were well, the Grand Army of the Potomac is immoveable, and that can be Simmered down in one word Mud!  I will not tell you the exact depth for fear you would not believe me, it is something less than two feet, the bottom of our tents are covered with mud, our boots and clothes are covered with mud, in fact everything is muddy, I saw a four horse team with an Army wagon attached, and the four horses could not pull the empty wagon, and they had to put an extra team on before they could pull it out, we are confined to our tents the most of the time, drilling is out of the question, and nothing is done but guard duty and that is very tedious, it has rained more or less every day for the last three weeks and still raining, (Kendall says mud, but it is not quite as bad as that.)  I see that a great many of the paper’s are advocating a forward movement, and among them the “Central Republican,” of Faribault, if the editor of that Paper was here as a “high Private in the rear rank” with a knapsack strapped to his back weighing 40 pounds, haversack on with three day’s rations, canteen filled with water, cartridge box on with 40 round’s of cartridges in it, besides gun and other fixens he would soon sing another song.  Lieut. Col. Miller is now in Washington, nearly recovered, but not fully.  Congressmen Wilkinson and Rice are moving heaven and earth to try and defeat Gen. Gorman, but I hope they will be baffled, for I want to see him confirmed, quite a change will soon take place in my affairs, that is I am going to take my discharge from the Army of the United States[.] I do this by the advice of Brigade Surgeon Hand, and Dr. Morton our Regimental Doctor, I was badly used up at Bull Run and they think I cannot stand a long march, and there will be plenty of marching to do and that at no very distant day […]“

See full letter: 1862-01-30_full_text

Citation:  January 30, 1862 Letter from Henry W. Lindergreen to Lieutenant Governor Ignatius Donnelly, Correspondence January-March 1862. Ignatius Donnelly and family papers, 1812-1973. Minnesota Historical Society.

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Letter from 15 year old soldier to his mother – January 29, 1862

Sunday, January 29th, 2012

Transcription of an excerpt from page 1 of a letter from Private Charles Goddard of the 1st Minnesota Regiment, to his mother, Catherine Smith, from Camp Stone. Goddard claimed to be eighteen years old upon volunteering to serve with the 1st Minnesota Volunteer Infantry Regiment. In fact, he was fifteen years old.

“Camp Stone Jan 29th 1862
Dear Mother[,] I received your letter while on reserve picket at Conrads Ferry[.] I think we had the finest time on picket of any time I have ben on [.] we were back from the river and had only one guarde and he only on during night[.] there was [17] files so that there was nothing for us to do[,] only shoot at a mark and hunt squirrels and any thing we had a mind[.] I see you have not received my letter stating that the box had come and that there was something in it that a fellow don’t get in the army evry day[.] There is nothing of much interest going on in camp. I suppose you have heard that our Conel [Colonel] N J T Dana is apointed Brigadier General […]“

See full letter: 1862-01-29_full_text

Citation: January 29, 1862 Letter from Charles Goddard to his mother, Correspondence 1853-1862. Smith, Orrin Fruit and Family Papers, 1829-1932. Minnesota Historical Society

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Invoice of medical stores – January 28, 1862

Saturday, January 28th, 2012

Invoice of medical stores received from C. H. Laub, Medical Purveyor Jan. 28th 1862.

“Acidi Sulphurici Aromat lbs 1 Instruments &c.
Alcoholis         [Qt bots] 6 Lancets, thumb  no 4
Camphorae  “s 1 Pocket sets  “ 1
Cerae Albae  “s 2/16 Probange  “ 6
Cerati Resinae  “s 2 Syringe, enema  “ 2
Simplicis “s 5 Trusses, Hernia  “ 6
Chloroformi  “s 2 Books, blank  “ 4
Emplastri Adhaesivi yds 10 Arrow root  lbs 5
Ichthyocollae  “ 2 Farina   “ 5
Extracti Senaegae flundi “s 1 Tea   “ 10
Liquoris Ammonai “s 4 Whiskey  Botts 12[…]“

Citation:  January 28, 1862 Invoice of Medical Stores; 1st MN Infantry, Hospital Reports, 1861-1863; p. 2. Minnesota: Adjutant General. Records. Minnesota Historical Society. State Archives.

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Carved bone hide scraper

Friday, January 27th, 2012

Carved bone hide scraper

Tool for scraping animal hide carved out of bone and used by Dakota Indians.  The metal scraping edge is tied to the bone handle with leather thongs; the handle itself is incised with decorative markings.  The tool was collected by Jacob C. Pope, Minnesota State Representative 1899-1903.  Creation date unknown, but probably 19th century.

For more details, view the scraper in our online collections catalog.

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“Religious Movements in Camp,” “From Washington,” and “The Cabinet Change-Secretary Stanton,” Mankato Independent – January 27, 1862

Friday, January 27th, 2012

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Children’s construction set

Thursday, January 26th, 2012

Children's construction set

Toy construction set for children manufactured by the Buildo Company of Minneapolis, Minnesota circa 1943-1964.  The cardboard box contains metal pieces, nuts, bolts, electrical wiring, chain and cord, and a paper booklet containing instructions for building a wide variety of models and motors.

For more details, view the construction set in our online collections catalog.

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Letter from Lieut. Col. George of 2nd Reg. describing recent battle – January 26, 1862

Thursday, January 26th, 2012

Transcription of a letter from Lieutenant Colonel James George of the 2nd Minnesota Infantry Regiment to Governor Alexander Ramsey describing his Regiment’s role in the January 19th battle at Mill Springs, Kentucky:

“In Camp Jan 26, [1862]  Gov Ramsey Dear Sir
Seeing in the papers that the credit of the victory of the 19th is given to the 18th W.I. Infantry, who were some [five] miles off, I thought I would say to you what will soon appear in the official record that the 9th Ohio and 2 Minn actually decided the fortunes of the day.  Our regt having as I think the [worser] position, the conflict was most terribly obstinate. the enemy fought like very devils. Our right wing was first engaged at not more than 12 or 15 feet distance and in many instances with muzzle to muzzle[.] sometimes our men[,] catching hold of the enemy’s guns and pulling them out of their hands. 400 of our men received slight bayonet wounds in the left hand while in the act of extending their pieces to fire thus running their hands against the bayonet of the enemy whose pieces were also [levelled] in the act of firing.
These [Gunmen] are no fancy sketches but naked truth and can be attested by every man of the right wing. This close fight lasted about 30 minutes when the enemy fled.
So far as I could see every man was doing his whole duty throughout the engagement.
This is written in the greatest haste. Col [McCook] [Robert L. McCook] being wounded Col VanCleve [Horatio P. Van Cleve] has command of Brigade and I of our rgt.
Your [Sir]  Lt. George”


Citation:  January 26, 1862 Letter from Lieut. Col. George.  Letters Received–2nd Regiment. Minnesota: Governor: Ramsey. Records. Minnesota Historical Society. State Archives.

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An Ounce of Preservation: A Guide to the Care of Papers and Photographs