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“Minnesota First Leads the Roll of Honor,” Saint Paul Daily Press – July 27, 1861

Wednesday, July 27th, 2011

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Corn cob holders

Tuesday, July 26th, 2011

Corn cob holders

Three metal corn-on-the-cob holders. Each holder has a three-pronged skewer for piercing the corn, a handle and a triangular support. Manufactured by F. P. Pfleghar and Son for use in Milwaukee Road passenger train dining cars, circa 1920-1950.

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Col. Gorman’s Official Report on 1st MN at Bull Run – July 26, 1861

Tuesday, July 26th, 2011

Official Report of Col. Gorman to Acting Brigadier General Franklin, of the part of the 1st Minnesota Regiment in the battle of Bull Run.

Excerpt from pages 255-256:


See here for full text: 1861-07-26_full_text

Citation:  1860-1862, p. 254-258. Minnesota Adjutant General. Annual and biennial reports. Minnesota Historical Society. State Archives.

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“Want of Cavalry” and “The Battle Near Manassas,” Saint Paul Daily Press – July 25, 1861

Monday, July 25th, 2011

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Bert Blyleven bobblehead doll

Monday, July 25th, 2011

Bert Blyleven bobblehead doll

Long-time Minnesota Twins pitcher and TV commentator Bert Blyleven was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame this past Sunday, July 24th, 2011. This bobblehead doll is one of a series owned by the Minnesota Historical Society and was given out during a June 8, 2001 Twins game.

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“The Care of the Regiment – Commendable Action of Gov. Ramsey,” Saint Paul Daily Press – July 24, 1861

Sunday, July 24th, 2011

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Letter from A. Wilken to his father about Bull Run – July 23, 2011

Saturday, July 23rd, 2011

Letter from Alexander Wilken to his father. It tells his tale of Bull Run, including walking 60 miles in 26 hours. Wilken was involved with the confusion with the Mississippi Regiment, took a prisoner, and only fired 3 times because he was busy giving orders.

“The night before the action I could not sleep as I had no blanket and the weather was very cold.  We started at 2 ½ in the morning, marched 15 miles to the battle field, (I having a severe cramp in the stomach and a sprained knee), fought for several hours and then walked back here 40 miles by the next morning and I am now as good as ever.  I walked at l east 60 miles in 26 hours. The day was disastrous but as for myself personally and in fact the Regiment is concerned have nothing to regret.”

See a full transcript 1861-07-23_transcript

See full letter 1861-07-23_full_text

Citation: July 23, 1861 Letter from Alexander Wilken to father, Correspondence and Related Papers, Jan- July 1861. Alexander Wilkin and Family Papers, 1770-1965. Minnesota Historical Society.

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Ambulance wagon on the Bull Run battlefield – July 22, 1861

Friday, July 22nd, 2011

Ambulance wagon on the Bull Run battlefield, 1861 Stereograph.

Available in the Photo and Art database

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Portable 1860s army stove

Friday, July 22nd, 2011

Portable army stove, openPortable army stove, closed

Portable kerosene stove made of tinned iron.  The stove has a brass button catch and opens flat with a reservoir and cloth tape wick in one half and two folding brass utensil supports in the other. The stove is stamped “E.P./ PARIS”.  It was used during the Civil War by Captain William Moore Leyde of the 1st Minnesota Heavy Artillery, Company B.

Since the publication of this post on July 22,2011,  MHS conservators and curators have uncovered new information about the stove’s intended use.  This new information is included in a follow-up post published on January 2,  2013.

Learn More:

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Captured Gun from First Battle of Bull Run – July 21, 1861

Thursday, July 21st, 2011


Captured Colt Model 1855 “Root” sidehammer revolver. This .28 caliber, five-shot revolver was captured by Javan B. Irvine of the 1st Minnesota Volunteer Infantry Regiment, Company A, during the the First Battle of Bull Run. 

At Bull Run, the 1st Minnesota had not yet been issued regular army uniforms and most of the men were wearing red flannel shirts, similar to the style worn by the 4th Alabama.  The uniform similarities caused confusion among the troops and allowed Private Irvine to force Confederate Lieutenant Colonel Bartley B. Boone of the 2nd Mississippi to surrender.  Boone was the highest ranking Confederate officer captured at the First Bull Run.  At gunpoint, Irvine forced Boone to dismount, disarmed him, and turned Boone over to a Union lieutenant to be taken to General Irvin McDowell.  While Irvine sent Boone’s sword with him, Irvine kept the revolver for himself. (Fire damage to the revolver occurred later, burning away the revolver’s grips.)

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An Ounce of Preservation: A Guide to the Care of Papers and Photographs