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Brenda J. Child wins Labriola Center American Indian National Book Award

Posted byAlison Aten on 31 Mar 2015 | Tagged as: Authors, Awards, Native American

My Grandfather's Knocking Sticks Brenda ChildWe’re delighted to note that My Grandfather’s Knocking Sticks: Ojibwe Family Life and Labor on the Reservation by Brenda J. Child has won the the seventh annual Labriola Center American Indian National Book Award.

Child uses her family’s own powerful stories to tell a different kind of history–one that puts her reader’s feet on the reservation. She shows how Ojibwe men and women on reservations around the Great Lakes sustained both their families and their cultural identity in the face of extreme prejudice and hardship.

Winners of  the Labriola Center American Indian National Book Award cross multiple disciplines or fields of study, are relevant to contemporary North American Indian communities, and focus on American Indian Studies, modern tribal studies, modern biographies, tribal governments or federal Indian policy.

Dedicated in 1993, the Labriola National American Indian Data Center in the Arizona State University (ASU) Libraries is one of the only repositories within a public university library devoted to American Indian collections. The Labriola Center holds both primary and secondary sources on American Indians across North America. The Center’s primary purpose is to promote a better understanding of American Indian language, culture, social, political and economic issues. The Labriola National American Indian Data Center has been endowed by Frank and Mary Labriola whose wish has been that “the Labriola Center be a source of education and pride for all Native Americans.”

My Grandfather’s Knocking Sticks is also a finalist for a Minnesota Book Award.

Three MNHS Press books are Minnesota Book Award Finalists!

Posted byAlison Aten on 05 Feb 2015 | Tagged as: Awards

Congratulations to our Minnesota Book Award finalists: Brenda J. Child for My Grandfather’s Knocking Sticks in the General Nonfiction category, Larry Millett and Matt Schmitt for Minnesota’s Own in the Minnesota category, and Lori Sturdevant for Her Honor, also in the Minnesota category. Finalists were announced this past weekend, and the winners will be revealed April 18 at the Minnesota Book Award Gala at St. Paul Union Depot.

My Grandfather's Knocking Sticks

Minnesota's OwnHerHonor_FINAL_rev.indd

Minnesota in the ’70s Documentary Nominated for an Upper Midwest Emmy®!

Posted byAlison Aten on 19 Aug 2014 | Tagged as: Arts, Awards, History, Videos


Minnesota in the ’70s, our documentary co-produced with Twin Cities Public Television’s Minnesota Productions & Partnerships (tptMN),  is nominated for a 2014 Upper Midwest Emmy® Award by the Upper Midwest Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences in the Historic/Cultural/Nostalgic category!

More about the project:

The 1970s were more than big hair, mirror balls, and leisure suits. These were the years that bridged the chasm between the anti-establishment tumult of the 1960s and the morning-in-America conservatism of the 1980s. In Minnesota, this evolution unfolded in ways that defied expectations. No longer was Minnesota merely a vague, snow-covered outpost in the American consciousness. It was a place of note and consequence—a state of presidential candidates, grassroots activism, civic engagement, environmental awareness, and Mary Tyler Moore. Its governor appeared on the cover of Time magazine. Its city skylines shot up with uncharacteristic immodesty. Its farmers enjoyed some of their best years ever. Minnesota forged an identity during the 1970s that would persist, rightly or wrongly, for decades to come.

This is the second nomination for an MNHS Press/tptMN co-production. Last year, our Asian Flavors documentary won an Upper Midwest Emmy® in the Cultural category!

MNHS Press Books & MNHS Receive 2014 AASLH Awards of Merit

Posted byAlison Aten on 26 Jun 2014 | Tagged as: Awards, History

The Dakota Prisoner of War Letters Minnesota in the \'70s

We are pleased to announce that four MNHS Press authors have received an Award of Merit from the American Association for State and Local History (AASLH) Leadership in History Awards. The AASLH Leadership in History Awards, now in its sixty-ninth year, is the most prestigious recognition for achievement in the preservation and interpretation of state and local history.

Our winners are:

Clifford Canku and Michael Simon for The Dakota Prisoner of War Letters: Dakota Kaŝkapi Okicize Wowapi

Dave Kenney and Thomas Saylor for Minnesota in the ’70s

The Minnesota Historical Society also received Awards of Merit for three other projects: The Dred Scott Family and the National Debate over Slavery program, Play the Past, and Northern Lights: The Stories of Minnesota’s Past.

This year, AASLH is proud to confer seventy-seven national awards honoring people, projects, exhibits, books, and organizations. The winners represent the best in the field and provide leadership for the future of state and local history. Presentation of the awards will be made at a special banquet during the 2014 AASLH Annual Meeting in St. Paul, Minnesota, on Friday, September 19. The banquet is supported by a generous contribution from the History Channel.

The AASLH awards program was initiated in 1945 to establish and encourage standards of excellence in the collection, preservation, and interpretation of state and local history throughout the United States.  The AASLH Leadership in History Awards not only honor significant achievement in the field of state and local history but also bring public recognition of the opportunities for small and large organizations, institutions, and programs to make contributions in this arena.

The American Association for State and Local History is a not-for-profit professional organization of individuals and institutions working to preserve and promote history.  From its headquarters in Nashville, Tennessee, AASLH provides leadership, service, and support for its members who preserve and interpret state and local history in order to make the past more meaningful in American society.  AASLH publishes books, technical publications, a quarterly magazine, and a monthly newsletter.  The association also sponsors regional and national training workshops and an annual meeting.

Another Winner! Minnesota History article receives David Stanley Gebhard Award

Posted byAlison Aten on 13 Mar 2014 | Tagged as: Awards, History

Building the Winona Post Office, 1890 (From Minnesota History Summer 2013, photo courtesy the Winona County Historical Society) Minnesota History authors Greg Gaut and Marsha Neff have won the biennial David Stanley Gebhard Article Award for “Downsizing the Public Realm: Building and Razing Winona’s Grand Post Office,” which appeared in the magazine’s Summer 2013 issue. Issued by the Minnesota chapter of the Society of Architectural Historians, the award considers articles focusing on some historical aspect of the built environment and published between July 1, 2011, and June 30, 2013.

“Buildings ultimately represent the values of the creators,” the authors say. “Public buildings, in particular, reflect the political, economic, and cultural priorities of the societies that construct them.” “Downsizing” clearly makes that case. In 1891, the city of Winona proudly dedicated its imposing Romanesque-style stone post office, after citizens had convinced the federal government to enlarge its initial building plans, increase the budget, and spring for more expensive materials. In the 1950s, businessmen, led by the Chamber of Commerce, launched the fight–which they ultimately won–to tear down that “old fashioned monument” and erect a modern, one-story, no frills post office, taking out a city park to do so. The park was deemed a luxury and the new building “a fresh, clean look for a fine old city.” Two eras, two buildings, and a seismic shift in understanding the public realm.

A three-judge panel selects the winning article from a minimum of five submissions. Gaut and Neff won the same award in 2008 for their work on the successful fight to preserve Winona’s county courthouse.

Mni Sota Makoce Wins 2014 Hognander Award

Posted byAlison Aten on 07 Mar 2014 | Tagged as: Authors, Awards, MHS Author in the News, MHS press, Native American

Gwen Westerman and Bruce White (courtsey of The Friends of the St. Paul Public Library)

Photo credit: Laura Truett, The Friends of the Saint Paul Public Library

We are delighted to announce that Mni Sota Makoce: The Land of the Dakota by Gwen Westerman and Bruce White is the winner of the 2014 Hognander Minnesota History Award.

The Hognander Minnesota History Award recognizes the most outstanding scholarly work related to Minnesota history published during the preceding two years. The award, funded by the Hognander Family Foundation, is presented every two years.

This award stems from the Hognander family’s belief in the importance of studying and preserving history. As Joe Hognander notes, “We established this award because of our relationship with the Minnesota Historical Society. Its commitment to excellence is noteworthy in promoting scholarly research and writing. We hope this award will inspire more activity by recognizing and rewarding the finest work in the field.”

Much of the focus on the Dakota people in Minnesota rests on the tragic events of the 1862 U.S.–Dakota War and the resulting exile that sent the majority of the Dakota to prisons and reservations beyond the state’s boundaries. But the true depth of the devastation of removal cannot be understood without a closer examination of the history of the Dakota people and their deep cultural connection to the land that is Minnesota. Drawing on oral history interviews, archival work, and painstaking comparisons of Dakota, French, and English sources, Mni Sota Makoce tells the detailed history of the Dakota people in their traditional homelands for at least hundreds of years prior to exile.

Published by Minnesota Historical Society Press in 2012, the book went on to win the 2013 Minnesota Book Award in the Minnesota category last year.

Westerman and White will be honored for their latest achievement at the upcoming Book Awards Gala on April 5 at the Saint Paul Union Depot. Gwen Westerman is professor of English and Humanities at Minnesota State University, Mankato. Bruce White is author of We Are at Home: Pictures of the Ojibwe People.

Love at the Soda Shop

Posted byAlison Aten on 05 Feb 2014 | Tagged as: Authors, Awards, Cooking, History

The Soda Fountain, February 1921Soda Shop SalvationWhen Prohibition shuttered saloons, thirsty law-abiding citizens turned to soda fountains for sustenance and entertainment. Parlor owners developed concoctions to suit every taste—and to keep their counters and tables full.

Soda Shop Salvation: Recipes and Stories from the Sweeter Side of Prohibition (a finalist for a Minnesota Book Award) gives readers a taste of this turbulent time, and a few recipes for romance.

Excerpt from Soda Shop Salvation:

Love at the Soda Shop

“The soda fountain often plays an important part in fanning the flame of love . . . Many fountain owners are finding there is a great demand for drinks with names like kiss me again, some day, soul kiss, lover’s delight [. . .] what better could quicken a bashful lover than to have his coy companion say I would like a soul kiss wouldn’t you, John?” —The Soda Fountain, December 1921

Cupid Delight Sundae

1 (1/2-inch) slice vanilla ice cream
3 tablespoons crushed pineapple
3 cubes canned or fresh pineapple
4 maraschino cherries
3 tablespoons crushed strawberries
2 Thin Walnut Wafers (see book for recipe)

Cut the ice cream in half across the long edge and place the two slices side by side on a plate. Pour the crushed pineapple over one slice and top with the pineapple cubes arranged in a circle with 1 cherry in the center. Pour the strawberries over the other ice cream slice and arrange the remaining 3 cherries in a circle on top of it. Put the wafers on the side and serve with two spoons.

Cupid’s Garden

1 large scoop vanilla ice cream
1 1/2 ounces (3 tablespoons) strawberry syrup
1 tablespoon cinnamon heart-shaped candies

Put the ice cream in a sundae dish and pour the syrup over the top. Sprinkle with the cinnamon candies.

Have-a-Date Sundae

1 large scoop maple nut ice cream
1 ounce (2 tablespoons) Hot Chocolate Fudge Sundae Sauce
2 tablespoons shredded coconut
whipped cream for topping
walnut-stuffed date for garnish

Put the ice cream in a sundae dish. Drizzle with the chocolate sauce and sprinkle with coconut. Top with whipped cream and garnish with the stuffed date.

“In the spring a young man’s fancy lightly turns to thoughts of love, while the young woman’s fancy yearningly turns to ice cream sodas. Better cater to her fancy.” —The Soda Fountain, March 1921

“Asian Flavors” wins Upper Midwest Regional Emmy® Award

Posted byAlison Aten on 01 Oct 2013 | Tagged as: Arts, Asian American, Awards, Cooking, Food, History, Immigration, MHS press

Regional Emmy® Award Courtesy of Twin Cities Public Television Raghavan Iyer with Regional Emmy® Award Asian Flavors documentary team

Our Asian Flavors documentary, co-produced with tptMN, won the 2013 Upper Midwest Regional Emmy® Award from the Upper Midwest Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences (NATAS) in the Cultural Documentary category.

Inspired by the book Asian Flavors: Changing the Tastes of Minnesota since 1875 by Phyllis Louise Harris with Raghavan Iyer, this thirty-minute documentary celebrates Asian immigrants who have left an indelible and flavorful mark on Minnesota’s culinary, cultural, and economic history.

Congratulations to a winning team!

The Asian Flavors team:

Daniel Pierce Bergin, Producer/Director
Angela Barrett, Production Assistant
Fanique Weeks-Kelley, Production Manager
Jim Kron, Director of Photography
Jerry Lakso, Online Editor
Bob Tracy, Executive in Charge
Pamela McClanahan, Project Consultant
Phyllis Louise Harris, Co-writer/Project Consultant
Raghavan Iyer, Presenter
Shari Lamke, Senior Director-Supervising Producer
Lucy Swift, Vice President, MN Productions & Partnerships
Terry O’Reilly, Chief Content Officer

Mark Anthony Rolo Reading Tonight in Marshall, MN

Posted byAlison Aten on 21 Feb 2013 | Tagged as: Authors, Awards, Native American

My Mother Is Now EarthMark Anthony Rolo with Rock Roy Rolo (photo by  Nicholas Rolo)We are pleased to announce that Mark Anthony Rolo’s My Mother Is Now Earth is a finalist for both a Minnesota Book Award and a Northeastern Minnesota Book Award.

The book depicts the story of the last three years of his mother’s life from the perspective of his child self. With an innocent and sometimes brutal child’s view, Rolo recounts stories of a woman who battles poverty, depression, her abusive husband, and isolation through the long northern Minnesota winters, and of himself, her son, who struggles at school, wrestles with his Ojibwe identity, and copes with violence. But he also shows, with eloquence and compassion, his adult understanding of his mother’s fight to live with dignity, not despair.

Rolo will be speaking tonight at Southwest State University in Marshall, Minnesota, as part of the Visiting Writers Series at SWSU. The event is at 7:00 p.m. in Charter Hall 201 and is free and open to the public.

Winners of the Northeastern Minnesota Book Awards Announced

Posted byMary Poggione on 20 May 2011 | Tagged as: Awards

Paddle NorthLast night, the winners of the Northeastern Minnesota Book Awards were announced in Duluth, and we at MHS are pleased to congratulate five of our authors: David LaRochelle and Joe Rossi, winners of the children’s literature prize  for Minnesota’s Hidden Alphabet; Layne Kennedy and Greg Breining, winners of the general nonfiction prize for Paddle North; and Anton Treuer, winner of a general nonfiction honorable mention for The Assassination of Hole in the Day. Check out the article in the Duluth News Tribune for the complete list of honorees.

Congratulations, all!

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